Let's look at apostrophes and see if we can crack the code! 

Today we are looking at how apostrophes can be used to form "possessive nouns"

An apostrophe can be used to show that one thing belongs to or is connected to something. This is called a possessive apostrophe

Use the three rules below to help you complete the activity sheet and then you'll be able to amaze your teacher with what you have learned! 

Don’t worry if you find it tricky at first. It can take a while. Adults are always getting this wrong! 

THE THREE RULES 

For singular possessive nouns (like girl, James, teachers), just add 's

       Example:  Boy + ’s = Boy’s 

For plural nouns that don’t end in s (like people, children, sheep), add 's 

      Example:  Children + ’s = Children’s 

For plural nouns that already end in s (like cats, cars, trees), add ‘  

        Example:  Dogs + ‘ = Dogs’ 

Download the activity sheet below for more!

Let's look at some examples. 

Read each phrase below and write it in possessive form. 

Example: The _puppy’s_ toy squeaks  

(puppy) 

1. The __________ blanket is pink. 

(baby) 

2. The __________ car broke down. 

  (woman) 

3. This is __________homework. 

 (James) 

4. I accidently took ________ jacket.

 (Anna)

5. My _________ project won first prize. 

(class) 

Read the sentences below and draw a line from one of the happy apostrophes to the place where you think it fits.

  1. I lost my football in Mr Doyles garden.
  2. I really enjoyed myself when I went to Elijahs house for dinner.
  3. The childrens dogs are very cute. 
  4. Keep the teachers book on the table. 
  5. My sisters car is blue and my mothers car is red.

Jokes

What's the longest word in the English language? "Smiles": there's a "mile" between the first and last letters. 

A comma is the difference between "What is this thing called love?" and "What is this thing called, love?" 

Teacher: Can someone give me a sentence starting with "I"? 
Student: I is-- 
Teacher: No. Always say, "I am." 
Student: All right, if you say so. I am the ninth letter of the alphabet. 

You've done great work. Well done! 

Now, let’s get creative with what we’ve learned.

Design a poster explaining that apostrophes are used for possessive nouns.