Any film with the name Jordan Peele attached to it is always going to attract attention - especially since his 2017 directorial debut, the horror film Get Out, was such a critical and box office success.

So here he is again, this time as producer and co-writer of this direct sequel to the 1992 horror film Candyman that returns to the now-gentrified Chicago neighbourhood where the slasher legend began.

But Peele isn't the only name with credibility bells ringing. 31-year-old director Nia DaCosta is currently doing a similar job on The Marvels, making her the youngest-ever director in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

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Then there’s an eye-catching Yahya Abdul-Mateen II in lead role of visual artist Anthony McCoy. His CV already includes The Get Down, Aquaman, The Trial of the Chicago 7, and an Emmy Award-winning part in the HBO adaptation of Watchmen.

McCoy is living in Chicago with his girlfriend, art gallery director Brianna Cartwright (Teyonah Parris, who also stars in The Marvels). He visits the nearby Cabrini-Green area where he bumps into a launderette owner who introduces him to the story of Sherman Fields, aka the Candyman.

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The legend goes that repeating the name 'Candyman' five times in front of a mirror makes him appear in the reflection and kill whoever spoke his name.

Inspired by this, Anthony develops an art exhibit around the legend of Candyman and showcases it at Brianna’s gallery.

After opening night, one of Brianna's co-workers and his girlfriend are slaughtered by Candyman after saying his name five times in front of a mirror.

Then the bodycount really begins.

Yahya Abdul-Mateen II

All in all, what you’ve got here is a modern take on the slasher movie, with the added bonus of it lacking the underlying ‘fear of the black man’ of the original.

Instead, I left the cinema after the screening wondering why white American cops are so racist.

This is great fun, with an underlying message. There’s a lot packed into these 91 minutes.