At the age of eight, a young Peter Frampton discovered Santa's gift of an acoustic guitar in the wee small hours of Christmas morning which led ultimately to a 54-year professional career in music which began eight years later at the age of 16.

"And from 3.30 am in the morning on Christmas when I was eight years old, I haven’t stopped playing since," the 70-year old rocker writes in his newly-published memoir, Do You Feel Like I Do?

The acclaimed English singer-songwriter and guitarist, now resident in Nashville, scored a massive global hit with his Frampton Comes Alive! double LPThat album, along with Gerry Rafferty’s Night Owl and Al Stewart’s Year of the Cat - throw in a few Supertramp LPs too maybe - was loudly prominent at many a flat party in the 1970s, from Dublin to London, from LA to Sydney.

In the new memoir, Frampton documents his rise to fame as lead singer with The Herd at the tender age of sixteen. That period was followed by ear-deafening adventures with the decibel-crashing rhythm-and-bluesy Humble Pie, fronted by the late Steve Marriott, a band he had co-founded.  

The heart-throb guitarist at the time of the Frampton Comes Alive! tour

The memoir details time spent hanging out with The Beatles, who were his friends and he played on George Harrison's solo debut, All Things Must Pass. Billy Preston, no less, featured on his first solo album, Winds of Change.

Once mooted as a potential guitarist with the Rolling Stones, he recorded with The Small Faces and Stevie Wonder, with Harry Nilsson and BB King. Later on in a busy career, he collaborated with members of Pearl Jam. 

Frampton's connections with David Bowie dated back to their schooldays and it was a life-long friendship. He was the guitarist with Bowie's band on the Glass Spider tour and the musician once played Dublin's then Point Theatre as a member of Ringo's All-Starr Band.

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Having departed Humble Pie, the strikingly handsome guitarist and singer began what would be a series of four solo albums with the beautiful, often wistfully reflective Winds of Change album in 1973. Then came Frampton Comes Alive!, released on January 6, 1976, a double live album which yielded the massive hits Show Me the Way and Baby, I Love Your Way. It sold eight million copies the year it was released and has shifted more than seventeen million copies to date. The album was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in January 2020.

The 1980s saw a definite resurgence in his career which had, somewhat inevitably, taken a dip after the huge success of Frampton Comes Alive! He was, by his own account, reputedly pushed into making an album too quickly to consolidate the success of that double album. "It was so hurtful when everything crashed," he writes. "I should have used the word 'no' a lot more."

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Success with Frampton Comes Alive! brought its own distractions, to say the least. There was substance abuse, binge-drinking, and depressive periods in his life, according to the musician. Some decidedly scary events have not been forgotten despite the revelry, like the time he was dangled out a fourth floor window by Keith Moon and John Entwistle from The Who. The British musician married three times - his good looks, he writes, were the bane of his existence and always got in the way.

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Frampton's farewell tour was due to take place this year, cancelled because of Covid, although there have been some virtual events.

Inclusion body myositis, a progressive muscle disorder, is likely to weaken Frampton's guitar-playing hands, hence the departure from live performance. In 2019, he spoke to CBS This Morning about the condition and revealed that he had been diagnosed almost four years beforehand.

"Look, it's not life-threatening. It's life-changing," the musician said. "What will happen, unfortunately, is that it affects the finger flexors… so for a guitar player, it's not very good." 

Do you Feel Like I do? is published by Hachette US in hardcover, E book and audio downloadable