He may be best remembered for playing the original James Bond, but Sean Connery had a remarkable and varied movie career.

Here are just some of the great films he starred in over the years . . . there are many more . . .

Goldfinger (1964)

Arguably the definitive Bond flick, with Sean Connery in great form as the MI6 agent is sent to investigate Auric Goldfinger. But that was just for starters.

There was the superb theme tune, the magnificent Aston Martin DB5 car, a brilliant villain in Gert Fröbe's eponymous sociopath, and Shirley Eaton immortalised in gold paint from head to toe.

We need your consent to load this YouTube contentWe use YouTube to manage extra content that can set cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please review their details and accept them to load the content.Manage Preferences

The Man Who Would Be King (1975)

John Huston directed this cracking adventure film, where Sean Connery was paired with another British film legend, Michael Caine.

The story follows the two leads as two British officers in the late 1800s who, while seeking fortune in the Middle East, end up being mistaken for gods. In fairness, Sean Connery pretty much fits that bill.

We need your consent to load this YouTube contentWe use YouTube to manage extra content that can set cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please review their details and accept them to load the content.Manage Preferences

The Untouchables (1987)

Connery won an Oscar for his performance in this Brian De Palma-directed crime drama written by David Mamet, and featuring a score composed by Ennio Morricone and period music by Duke Ellington.

Kevin Costner starred as Eliot Ness, as he forms the Untouchables team to bring Al Capone (Robert De Niro) to justice during Prohibition. But It was Connery who stole the film as Jimmy Malone.

We need your consent to load this YouTube contentWe use YouTube to manage extra content that can set cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please review their details and accept them to load the content.Manage Preferences

Indiana Jones and The Last Crusade (1989)

Comedy was part of the Connery canon as he proved when playing the father of Indiana Jones in the much-loved Steven Spielberg series of adventure films.

Spielberg had been a fan of Connery's work as James Bond and felt that no one else could perform the role as well. And who's going to argue with one of the greatest-ever movie directors?

We need your consent to load this YouTube contentWe use YouTube to manage extra content that can set cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please review their details and accept them to load the content.Manage Preferences

The Hill (1965)

Set in North Africa during WWII, this Sidney Lumet-directed drama focuses on a group of prisoners at a military prison who are subjected to constant brutality from sadistic guards.

Connery gives one of his best performances as Joe Roberts, the defiant prisoner who is openly defiant of the guards, particularly Staff Sergeant Williams, played by Ian Hendry.

We need your consent to load this YouTube contentWe use YouTube to manage extra content that can set cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please review their details and accept them to load the content.Manage Preferences

Dr No (1962)

The first-ever James Bond movie stands up remarkably well, given that it’s almost 60 years old. Connery had 007 down to a tee from the start.

Produced on a low budget, Dr No was a financial success and gained a reputation over time as one of the franchise’s finest. It also set up the 1960s as the decade of the spy movie genre. Didn't do Connery's career any harm either.

We need your consent to load this YouTube contentWe use YouTube to manage extra content that can set cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please review their details and accept them to load the content.Manage Preferences

The Name of the Rose (1986)

This is as far removed from Bond as you could get: an Italian-German-French mystery and historical drama directed by Jean-Jacques Annaud, based on the novel of the same name by Umberto Eco.

Sean Connery won a BAFTA for his turn as the Franciscan friar William of Baskerville, who finds himself being called upon to solve a deadly mystery in a medieval abbey.

We need your consent to load this YouTube contentWe use YouTube to manage extra content that can set cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please review their details and accept them to load the content.Manage Preferences

Time Bandits (1981)

Terry Gilliam’s films have always been quirky and unique, and this one is certainly no different in that regard, as an 11-year-old goes time-travelling with six dwarves.

Here,Connery appears in a supporting role as Agamemnon. The casting choice derives from a joke Michael Palin included in the script, in which he describes the character removing his mask as being 'Sean Connery - or someone of equal but cheaper stature’.

We need your consent to load this YouTube contentWe use YouTube to manage extra content that can set cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please review their details and accept them to load the content.Manage Preferences

Marnie (1964)

This time around, Connery got to work with yet another master of movie-making, the great British director Alfred Hitchcock, with a great score from Bernard Hermann.

Although it’s not one of Hitchcock’s finest moments, Marnie stands up thanks to the on-screen chemistry between Sean Connery and Tippi Hedren as a wealthy widower who marries a psychologically-damaged former thief.

We need your consent to load this YouTube contentWe use YouTube to manage extra content that can set cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please review their details and accept them to load the content.Manage Preferences

The Hunt For Red October (1990)

In the latter stages of his career, Sean Connery starred in several very successful thrillers - such as The Russia House (1990), The Rock (1996), and Entrapment (1999) - that proved to be box office gold.

This is an old-fashioned submarine thriller that grossed over $200 million, with Connery starring as Marko Ramius, a rogue Soviet Union naval captain who seeks to defect to the United States.

We need your consent to load this YouTube contentWe use YouTube to manage extra content that can set cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please review their details and accept them to load the content.Manage Preferences