Fast-rising pop star Aimée has released her debut EP Confession and she says that two of the songs were inspired by her late mother, who passed away two years ago.

Speaking to RTÉ Entertainment, the 25-year-old singer from Swords in Dublin, said, "it'll be two years next week when we lost her. The day I wrote I’m OK was the first time I spoke honestly about my mam at all so once I started, I couldn’t stop.

"I remember coming away from the session and thinking I may have to go back and redo that because I didn’t want it to be too on the nose. I always like people to be able to relate to my songs but Richey, my producer, said no, this is your song about your mam and you have to tell your story, don’t change it at all."

Aimée pictured with her late mother 

Such is the emotional power of the song for the singer with the punchy pop sound that she has only ever performed it once. 

"I don’t think it’s one I’ll be able to perform at every show because I have to be up for it, but the response I’ve gotten back from it just validates the reason I did it," she says.

"We’re all quick to feel sorry for ourselves and think 'poor me, everyone else has their mam' but it’s not the case at all. The amount of messages I’ve got from people who’ve lost a loved one and relate to the song is ridiculous. We get into our heads and feel sorry for ourselves sometimes, so it’s a good little reality check."

We need your consent to load this YouTube contentWe use YouTube to manage extra content that can set cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please review their details and accept them to load the content.Manage Preferences

Confession also boasts another song about her mum, the more upbeat What My Mama Gave Me. So, not to put too fine a point on it, what did her mama give her? 

"Haha. Everything! Everybody says I am her absolute double in every way, from looks to attitude to everything. It’s only as a adult that I’m remembering back to since I was kid that mam was teaching us lessons all the time but the biggest thing she gave me was this head on my shoulders."

The Confession EP is out now 

Inspired by the nineties and early naughties era of girl power and straight down the line pop bangers by the likes of divas Britney Spears and Christina Aguilera, she produced the five-track EP with producer Richey McCourt, who has previously worked with Will Young and Pixie Lott, in his home studio in Blanchardstown in northwest Dublin. 

She agrees that now more than ever there is a need for the solidarity expressed in girl power songs. 

"Absolutely. I think that because people think that things are really changing for women in the world that it’s enough and yeah, they are but we’re not there yet and I think it’s so important. I’ve always been a girl’s girl and I think it’s so important that we stick together in the music industry.

"I’ve been so lucky that I’ve haven’t met one female artist in Ireland who hasn’t been so lovely and so supportive. They’re all so lovely and up for helping each other, it’s great."

However, she says she does feel pressure not be considered as a diva. "There’s still this thing in the industry that if a female artist speaks up for herself or has an opinion, she’s labelled a diva, which is ridiculous because it’s not the cast for a man. That’s still a thing for women in the industry."

We need your consent to load this YouTube contentWe use YouTube to manage extra content that can set cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please review their details and accept them to load the content.Manage Preferences

Aimée currently lives in the coastal village of Loughshinny near Skerries and like many of us, she is currently observing the self-isolation measures introduced by the Covid-19 outbreak, but as a musician, it’s proving particularly challenging.

"Some days are busy and some days you find yourself varnishing random things in your house. But self-isolating is the right thing to do right now."

She hasn’t reached out - as they say in America - to any of her fellow artists to offer support. "Not yet because we’ve been so busy promo-wise with the EP coming out this weekend but a lot of us Irish artists keep in touch with each other so I’m definitely going to see what people's plans are because we have to make a living."

2019 was a golden year for Irish music, with particularly strong comebacks for rock and the continued blossoming of our homegrown hip hop scene but what about pop? Does Aimée reckon Irish pop is in good health right now? 

"I don’t think it’s there yet," she says. "But it’s definitely making big steps. As well there are lots of Irish artists who are afraid to explore straight down the line pop because it’s so associated with that American sound or Swedish sound. 

"When I say I’m straight down the line pop, a lot of people say 'Oh! That’s brave!’ The Irish talent is just ridiculous, it’s crazy and I’m hoping 2020 will be the year of Irish pop." 

Alan Corr @CorrAlan2

Confession is out now. Aimée plays Whelan’s in Dublin on October 7.