Legendary blues musician Eric Clapton has recalled rare feelings of musical satisfaction one night in Philadelphia near the end of Cream's touring days in the early Seventies.

"We knew it was over, " he told Rolling Stone, referring to his two band-mates, drummer Ginger Baker and late bassist Jack Bruce. "We were just having a good time playing. And I remember thinking, ‘This is as great as it will ever be.’ Have I ever been satisfied? Definitely for one night, yeah."

He believes in retrospect that the 1960s and early 1970s were `a good time.' He pointed out that "anything could happen, and it had nothing to do with success."

"There wasn't a consciousness about what would be successful or not. It didn't matter as long as you took a shot at everything and just kept on playing. And if anyone came in, [they could] join in. It was open."

By the time the 1990s arrived, Clapton says he was dismayed and confused by the competitive nature of music. "Bands were aggressive to one another, judgmental. You just make records and hope that they do better than the other guy's records."

Ed Sheeran - friends with Eric Clapton

Clapton, who is proud winner of 18 Grammy awards, compared the way Cream did things with the entrepeneurial spirit of his friend Ed Sheeran.

"There wasn't a consciousness about what would be successful or not. It didn't matter as long as you took a shot at everything and just kept on playing. And if anyone came in, [they could] join in. It was open."

"We didn't consider what we were doing as business," he said. "I always use Cream as an example. We were just told where to go. We didn't have time to think about how much money we were making, what was the right strategy, which town you should go to.

"Now you have guys like Ed who direct and produce their own shows. The music is part of that. But we couldn't have done it that way then. It would have been a distraction."

The guitarist also considered his instrument's relevance in modern music. "There is always something to listen to, to aspire to, with the guitar," he said. "It is still the most flexible instrument. You can improvise on it. You have such freedom. I don't think there is a limit to it. "

Clapton revealed that he is working on a new album and planning some live shows in 2018. The new documentary, Eric Clapton: Life in 12 Bars will released on Showtime next year.

The film explores Clapton's troubled childhood, his struggle with drugs and alcohol and the tragic loss of his son Conor, to whom he dedicated the song Tears in Heaven

The film also includes extensive interviews with Clapton himself and his friends and family, with appearances from other acclaimed guitarists including the late BB King, Jimi Hendrix and George Harrison.