Rap artist Eminem has won a copyright infringement case against the New Zealand National Party, who used a track similar to his hit song Lose Yourself in an election campaign advertisement.

The political party has been ordered by New Zealand's high court to pay the rapper's publisher NZ$600,000 in damages for using a song very similar in melody and rhythm to the 2002 hit single.

The National Party used a track titled Eminem Esque for the election advert which the party's lawyers said they bought from a stock music library.

The court ruled on Wednesday that the track was "sufficiently similar" to Eminem's original work and that it impinged on the copyright.

We need your consent to load this YouTube contentWe use YouTube to manage extra content that can set cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please review their details and accept them to load the content.Manage Preferences

The ruling stated: "Eminem Esque has substantially copied Lose Yourself. The differences between the two works are minimal; the close similarities and the indiscernible differences in drum beat, the ‘melodic line’ and the piano figures make Eminem Esque strikingly similar to Lose Yourself."

Garry Williams, who represented Eminem, said that the rapper's "iconic musical composition" was rarely licensed and that it is "a jewel in the crown of Eminem’s catalogue".

Meanwhile, lawyer Adam Simpson, who represented Eminem's publisher Eight Mile Styles, said: "We think it’s a very strong judgment, and a cautionary tale for people who make or use sound-alikes around the world."

Lose Yourself is one of Eminem's best known tracks and featured on the soundtrack to his semi-autobiographical film 8 Mile.

It won the Academy Award for Best Original Song in 2003 and a Grammy for best rap song in 2004.

We need your consent to load this YouTube contentWe use YouTube to manage extra content that can set cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please review their details and accept them to load the content.Manage Preferences