Last Saturday, Beyoncé and Jay-Z surprised fans with their new collaborative album Everything is Love

Siobhán Kane spoke to Sean Rocks on Arena about the power couple and about the socio-political and artistic connotations of their latest offering.  "It’s seen as the last in the trilogy of the marriage arc of albums between the two of them," said Siobhán, coming after Beyoncé’s Lemonade album in which she didn’t hold back on her feelings about her husband’s behaviour.

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"She really shamed him in a sense because it was about the idea of her kind of pain becoming transformative. She was very let down, very disappointed, very publically humiliated. A lot of people will remember Solange as well in the elevator at the Met ball and that there was the kind of mystery about what was the kind of crux of this, so she was very ashamed and what happened with Jay-Z was this idea that he had to, in some way, (make) reparation musically and artistically… They do use their life as art."

Siobhán describes this album as a kind of game the couple are playing with the audience.

"They’re saying 'We’re giving you so much but we also can retain a sense of mystery'. Even, for example, they’re one of the most visible couples and also individual artists in music and yet they still surprised everybody. It’s very much the kind of Bowie thing who’s also so great in terms of image and being extremely canny, but also very private and being able to straddle the public and private sphere but controlling the narrative."

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Sean asked about one of the videos from the new album which the pair shot at the Louvre in Paris and which featured a series of iconic pieces of art.

"They end with the Portrait of a Negress which is again a very, very again deliberate point… Solange, Beyonce’s sister, last year took over the Guggenheim, and canonically a very white kind of space, and filled it as one of the critics said a kind of temple to black women so Jay-Z and Beyoncé are doing exactly the same thing… They felt excluded from certain narratives so they used the Venus de Milo for example and then, later on, they end up with the Portrait of a Negress to say, you know what, we’re outsiders, but we’re actually natural heirs to this throne, to the Louvre, we’re making out own compelling narrative."

Click here to listen to Arena.