If you're responsible for one of the 85 million (and counting) views that Childish Gambino's latest music video This is America has racked up since it went live last weekend, you'll probably fall into one of two camps: 1) You've been a fan of Donald Glover since his Community days or 2) You're wondering who the hell this 'Childish Gambino' character actually is. 

The short answer: one of the few American musicians who have stepped up to answer his country's current political and social mayhem with a defiant musical statement.

The long answer is a little more complex.

We need your consent to load this YouTube contentWe use YouTube to manage extra content that can set cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please review their details and accept them to load the content.Manage Preferences

Hired by Tina Fey as a writer for 30 Rock at the age of 23, the now-34-year-old Glover came to prominence as an actor in aforementioned cult sitcom Community, playing flawed-but-goofy jock-turned-nerd Troy Barnes. In recent years, he has been better known for both creating and starring (and occasionally directing) comedy-drama Atlanta on US network FX - which follows the adventures of Earn (played by Glover) and his cousin Alfred as they negotiate the Atlanta hip-hop scene. You'll soon see him as Lando Calrassian in Solo: A Star Wars Story and as the voice of Simba in Jon Favreau's remake of The Lion King. Safe to say that his star in the acting world remains firmly on the ascent. 

As impressive as that portion of CV is, however, his work as Childish Gambino has earned him equal accolades. Actors who release albums often have them dismissed as vanity projects, but since his debut album was released in 2011, Glover's music has been roundly praised and well-received, even bagging him a Grammy for his 2016 album Awaken, My Love

Donald Glover in Atlanta

Nothing, however, has been on the scale of This is America, though – the song and video that has gotten the whole world talking this week, spawning tens of thinkpieces and more 'This is what you might have missed' listicles than Buzzfeed can find time to publish. The Hiro Murai-directed video is a provocative, violent, challenging and seriously clever promo with finely-tuned details revealed upon each repeated viewing. It arguably encapsulates more about America and its attitude towards guns, black people and society's obsession with both self and social media in 4 minutes than most commentators or political journalists have managed in the 1 year and 111 days of Donald Trump's presidency to date. 

We need your consent to load this YouTube contentWe use YouTube to manage extra content that can set cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please review their details and accept them to load the content.Manage Preferences

His performance of the song on Saturday Night Live (which he also hosted) last weekend also caused quite a stir. Even without the defiant video, the song is a powerful statement and the impressive dancers and light show that accompanied the bare-chested Glover made for a chilling, unsettling watch that you found it hard to rip your eyes away from. 

Add to that the recent profile of him in The New Yorker – which examined the video and the song in the context of his career to date – and it seems like his moment has well and truly arrived on a grand scale. 

If there's one thing that we've learned over the last few years in particular, it's that few artists in the music world – particularly the world of hip-hop, save perhaps Kendrick Lamar and Chance the Rapper – are using their platform to actually say anything meaningful. That makes work like This is America arguably more important than it ever has been; after all, isn't art's role (or at least one facet of it) to reflect, dissect and attempt to discern what's going on in the world? 

With his new (and reportedly, his last) album reportedly due for release this year, needless to say, the world – not just America - awaits it with baited breath.