In recent years, there has been a glut of hugely (and perhaps unexpectedly) successful TV adaptations of well-known films. From Fargo to The Exorcist to Bates Motel – and even The Young Offenders, seen recently on Irish TV screens. 

Are producers running out of ideas for TV shows? Is rehashing and extending a story and its characters always a good thing? It's a tricky one; on one hand, as much as you may love a film (like The Godfather, for example), it feels sinful to assume that a series would improve upon the original story. On the other, there is often a desire to delve into the background and learn more about your favourite film characters and their backstories.

Not all films lend themselves to a TV adaptation, but below are five that we reckon would really work. 

1. Cloverfield (2008) 

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Forget about the disappointment of the most recent Cloverfield installment The Cloverfield Paradox; disregard the excellent 10 Cloverfield Lane, too. The first Cloverfield film, released in 2008, would make a brilliant standalone TV series. Think about it: an enormous reptilian creature and its parasitic minions are destroying New York City, but the found footage-style plot is only the tip of the iceberg of what's happening. There's an opportunity for a TV series to follow many other different characters (in different locations around the world) as they come to terms with this new, grotesque reality. We're in. 

2. Wind River (2017) 

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Unquestionably one of the best films of last year, Wind River is ripe for development into a series. A murder mystery set on a desolate Indian Reservation in Wyoming, it saw Jeremy Renner's local wildlife agent team up with FBI rookie Elizabeth Olsen to solve the unusual death of a local teenage girl. With spectacular landscape, fantastic characters and superb writing, it was like a hybrid of a less-weird Twin Peaks with True Detective. We'd 100% watch an entire series. 

3. The Witch (2015) 

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What do you mean, you haven't seen The Witch yet? In fairness, Robert Eggers' 2015 film flew under the radar to a certain degree, probably because it was too damned strange for mainstream audiences to get on board with. It's one of the most atmospheric horrors we've seen in years, following a Puritan family banished from their New England community in the 17th century for 'religious differences' – and it doesn't take long for some bone-chilling stuff to start happening. With the ending left brilliantly open-ended, TV is crying out for a series that incorporates witchcraft and the supernatural in a non-schmaltzy, anti-Hollywood manner. There's an appetite for the macabre amongst TV viewers, and this film would provide the perfect jumping-off point. 

4. The Commitments (1991) 

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It's been translated to both the big screen and the stage and has won massive plaudits for both – so why couldn't Roddy Doyle's novel about an unlikely up-and-coming Dublin soul band translate to TV, too? In fact, we daresay that a small screen adaptation could be the pick of the bunch, as it would leave room to explore the backstory of each character, and who doesn't want to know more about Joey the Lips and his mammy, for instance? A throwback to '90s nostalgia with some young Irish actors and musicians to liven things up and a sharp writer on board to retain the comedy and wit of the original: this could definitely work. 

5. Gangs of New York (2002) 

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We don't know about you, but we have a serious hankering for any gang-related period drama set in New York and its environs. There have been many over the years, but Martin Scorsese's superbly-crafted 2002 epic was one of the most memorable, with Daniel Day-Lewis's ruthless Bill 'The Butcher' Cutting going head-to-head in 1860s New York with Leonardo DiCaprio's Amsterdam Vallon and his band of Irish immigrant hoodlums, hell-bent on seeking revenge for his father's death. True, the film is pretty long at almost 3 hours – but imagine a) the stories b) the action scenes and c) the costumes that could play out across a 10-part TV series? Deception, power struggles, violence, passion – the source material for a successful adaptation is already there.