National Treasures is a campaign to crowd-source everyday objects that explore the history of the island of Ireland over the past 100 years - and we are asking you to participate in the creation of a digital archive of historical objects.

The National Treasures project encompasses a website, four public roadshow events in October 2017, a four-part RTÉ television series in April 2018, followed by an exhibition in the National Museum of Ireland.

Do you have an object at home that reveals a fascinating part of our history, culture or heritage?

By collecting objects and revealing the fascinating stories behind them, we want this project to form a unique crowd-sourced tapestry of modern Irish history, one that emphasises the voices of ordinary Irish people. Sometimes the simplest object can be a trigger for an amazing piece of social history and significant cultural value can be found in the strangest items.

For your chance to join us on RTÉ ONE next year and potentially have your object included in the exhibition, come along to one of the public roadshow events taking place this month to have your object assessed by professional historians. Click here to find out more information.

So get involved, dig out your most cherished possessions and be part of this unique public history project!

One of our favourite objects (and stories) submitted to date comes from Julia Young:

'I was in a club in London called the Speakeasy in 1973 when after coming out of the ladies room , I was asked would I like to go to a party. As I turned I saw a tall gorgeous guy who I remembered seeing on TOTPs the night before. His name was Phil Lynott. I told him I was with my girlfriend and would have to check with her. I took his hand and led him to her and we agreed to go with him. Frank Murray who was their tour manager and Peter Green of Fleetwood Mac were there too and five of us got into my car which was a Triumph Herald to the party behind the London Hilton. I dated Philip for a while and knew him for about 3 yrs. As he was getting more famous we drifted apart. He gave me many bits I still have , including this lizard brooch he wore on his jacket in the early days. I now go over to Dublin twice a year for the vibe and bash and am good friends with his mam Philomena after all these years. I'm proud to have been a part of his short life. As he was getting more popular, I was losing touch with him because he was around the world touring. A month before he died, my friend ran into him and he wanted us all to meet up again but that never happened. To me, it is unbelievable to know him when he had nothing and now that he is a legend. It's a sad story, but it's amazing in many ways and I'm glad to have played a small role in his life.'

For your chance to join us on RTÉ ONE next year and potentially have your object included in the exhibition, come along to one of the public roadshow events taking place this month to have your object assessed by professional historians. Click here to find out more information.

So get involved, dig out your most cherished possessions and be part of this unique public history project!