The word 'legendary' is rather overused these days, but when it comes to visionary German filmmaker and unlikely cultural icon Werner Herzog, it seems entirely fitting. Now Herzog is coming to Ireland for an eagerly-anticipated appearance at this year's International Literature Festival Dublin

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Due to turn 75 in September, Herzog first came to prominence as one of the key proponents of the New German Cinema of the '70s, with austere, otherworldly arthouse classics like The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser (1974), Heart of Glass (1976) and Stroszek (1977). He rose to international prominence via a remarkable series of cinematic collaborations with leading man Klaus Kinski - Aguirre, the Wrath of God (1972), Woyzeck (1979), Nosferatu the Vampyre (1979), Fitzcarraldo (1982) and Cobra Verde (1985). Herzog's notoriously volatile relationship with Kinski is the stuff of movie lore - while shooting Fitzcarraldo in the Amazon rainforest, Herzog later revealed that one of the native chiefs offered to kill Kinski for him, but that he declined because he needed the actor to complete filming.

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In recent decades, the endlessly prolific Herzog has become one of cinema's most celebrated documentarians, discovered by new audiences thanks to works like the Oscar-nominated Grizzly Man (2005), acclaimed TV series On Death Row (2012), and recent Netflix releases Lo And Behold and Into The Inferno. Simultaneously, he's branched out into acting, notably a memorable turn as the bad guy in Tom Cruise thriller Jack Reacher, and loaned his oft-impersonated Germanic tones to animated shows like The Simpsons and Rick And Morty. Mythical stories of Herzog's exploits are plentiful, whether being shot by an unknown assailant during an interview with the BBC's Mark Kermode or rescuing actor Joaquin Phoenix from a car wreck.

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An Evening With Werner Herzog will take place at the National Concert Hall on Sunday May 21st, as part of this year's International Literature Festival Dublin 2017 - additionally, best-selling Norwegian crime fiction writer Jo Nesbo has been announced for a special pre-festival event at the RDS Concert Hall on Friday April 21st. For further information and tickets, go to the ILF website.