What constitutes an overlooked or forgotten album?

That is open to a degree or interpretation and debate. What better forum to tackle this than a book? That was part of what prompted me to put together the first volume of Buried Treasure, published last year, and Vol.2 seemed like the most natural thing to do once I had finished the first book.

I started working on Vol.2 the week that Vol.1 was published. Take a break and get some rest? Nonsense, putting together books such as these is highly addictive, and besides that, there was one album that I really wanted to feature in the first book, but for a number of reasons, it didn't go in.

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In 1995, Cork band Interference released their one and only album. I remember DJs such as Dave Fanning, Tom Dunne and Mike Moloney used to play it on their shows, and it became one of those albums that I placed on a pedestal alongside Jeff Buckley's Grace, Achtung Baby by U2, and Lir's Magico! Magic! The album 'Interference' was the starting point, and off I went of this journey of ups and downs once again.

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Along the way, I would discover tremendous albums by artists such as Jane Weaver, Alan Vega, and World Party. Hearing individuals such as Garbage's (not to mention Nevermind producer) Butch Vig talking passionately about Goodbye Jumbo by the aforementioned World Party, or Candi Staton recounting stories from the late 1960's, was something that I won't forget in a hurry. Others like Guy Garvey, Gemma Hayes, Conor O'Brien, and Maria Doyle Kennedy were equally gushing about albums as diverse as you could hope for.

The idea and ethos of this book is straightforward, so in many respects there was never any confusion over whether I was straying off the point. That said, as time went by and deadlines grew close, I started to remember what that feeling we call pressure feels like again; the last time that I felt this much was before I sat my Leaving Cert!

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Listening back to albums that I loved in years and decades past was a real pleasure. Some, like Hawaii by The High Llamas, Cane141's Moon Pool, and Mark Geary's self-titled debut, I hadn't heard in far too long - an unforgivable lapse on my part. 

It's finally finished now, and the overall feeling in a mixture of relief,  mild exaltation, and nerves over people liking it. I'd love to say that I don't care what people think of it, but I do. So far there has been a Buried Treasure Vol.1, Vol.2, and who knows - a Vol.3 may join them at some point in the future.

Buried Treasure: Volume 2 (published by Liberties Press) is out now.