In the week that Joseph O'Brien won 'the race that stops a nation' with Twilight Payment, the build-up to the Breeders' Cup has been eclipsed by an enthralling two-horse contest stateside. 

The defending champion – a powerful New York-bred chestnut – may have been sent off the outsider, but he broke swiftly from the gates and made what briefly seemed to be a race-winning move, hitting a low of just under 1-4 in-running in a Betfair market that has seen almost €600m matched. 

However, his opponent – a deceptively nimble grey – stayed on best on the run to the line, appearing to win a shade cosily. 

Connections of the runner-up now seem intent on appealing the result, maintaining that their challenger suffered interference in the home straight which compromised his winning chance, but an amended result is priced up at 20-1, reflecting market scepticism over those unsubstantiated claims and major doubts over him taking the result in the stewards' room. 

We can only hope that the Breeders' Cup Turf (9.33pm Irish time) is a less contentious affair. 

The Breeders' Cup Classic (10.18pm) may be the feature race on the card, but it's one that's run on a dirt surface and traditionally bereft of a legitimate European contender.

With no Euro challengers lining up in the $6m contest for a second consecutive year, many Irish eyes will shift their main focus to the Turf.

Half the 10-runner field hails from European yards, and the three market principals are trained in Ireland. 

Aidan O'Brien is represented by Magical and Mogul as he bids for a seventh win in the mile and a half event. 

We need your consent to load this YouTube contentWe use YouTube to manage extra content that can set cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please review their details and accept them to load the content.Manage Preferences

Ryan Moore partners Magical as the mare steps up in trip after her third-place finish in the Champion Stakes on her most recent outing. 

Her best form may have come over shorter trips than the one she tackles here, but the daughter of Galileo does boast Group One-winning form against her own sex over 12 furlongs. 

Magical's most recent run over the distance came in last season's Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe, where her fifth-place finish behind Waldgeist reads quite well when you consider that she stuck too closely to a hot early pace, and she was only just touched off by Enable in the 2018 running of this race at Churchill Downs. 

The tight nature of the track, the prevailing good ground, and the suspicion that the race won't be run at a brisk early tempo should allow her to see out the trip well.

Mogul lurks just behind his stablemate and Tarnawa in the market and claimed the first Group One of his career in the Grand Prix de Paris last time out. 

He's long been highly regarded at Ballydoyle, but his Longchamp victory was the first time he lived up to his reputation during his Classic campaign, and there's a suspicion he was slightly flattered by the visual impression he made that day in the French capital. 

Pierre-Charles Boudot's decision to allow his mount to sit well off the blistering fractions set by the trailblazers reaped major dividends late on, and it's worth noting that his three nearest pursuers at the line were all returning from lengthy absences and lacking race-fitness. 

Mogul will relish the fast surface, but he might also need a fast pace to be seen at his very best. 

We need your consent to load this YouTube contentWe use YouTube to manage extra content that can set cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please review their details and accept them to load the content.Manage Preferences

It might just be that Dermot Weld's Tarnawa is the likeliest winner of the race after looking transformed in 2020. 

She made a belated winning return to the track in August before capturing the Group One Prix Vermeille in stunning style. 

Not entered in the Arc, Tarnawa dropped down in distance and followed up in the Prix de l'Opera at Longchamp's flagship meeting. 

Sectional times from those two victories confirm that the daughter of Sharmadal possesses a remarkable turn of foot. That's the main weapon in her armory, and it's one that decides races everywhere, but particularly US turf races. 

Christophe Soumillon has quickly developed a formidable relationship with the mare. His coronavirus-enforced absence has to be regarded as a negative, but deputy Colin Keane will be aware of her running style and the need for a patient waiting ride before delivering that finishing effort. 

We need your consent to load this YouTube contentWe use YouTube to manage extra content that can set cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please review their details and accept them to load the content.Manage Preferences

The remainder of the European team is rounded off by the John Gosden-trained duo of Lord North and Mehdaayih, and German raider Donjah. Mehdaayih is the outsider of the Gosden runners, but has stamina in her locker, something that her stablemate may not. She also arrives here fresh after an interrupted campaign, unlike a number of her rivals. 

The US turf runners are often maligned as inferiors to their European rivals. However, that's not always the case, and the fact the home team attempt to peak here when the Euros have done so weeks earlier at the Arc meeting or at British Champions Day can allow them to bridge the gap. 

If there is to be an American fly in the ointment for the European contingent, it may just come in the form of the quirky Channel Maker.

He races with a rather ungainly high head carriage and he's capable of throwing in a few clunkers, but on his day the six-year-old gelding is an impressive performer. 

Channel Maker does seem a need-to-lead sort and one who would prefer a little more give in the ground, but while the going may be against him, he might just benefit from a pace scenario which grants him an uncontested advantage early on.