Around 30,000 women ran and walked the 37th women's mini-marathon in Dublin this afternoon.

They started from Fitzwilliam Square just after the scheduled start time of 2pm with a 22-year-old student from Kilkenny the first runner to reach the Baggot Street finish line.

Aoibhe Richardson is home for the summer from her studies in the United States. It was her first time running the event and she finished in just over 34 minutes.

Many participants ran in support of good causes and the organisers say more than €217 million has been raised since the event first started.

The 10km run is the biggest all women's event of its kind in the world.

It has grown steadily in numbers since it began in 1983. 

Separately in Cork, four Irish Olympians including Olive Loughnane and Rob Heffernan were among 8,000 people taking part in Cork's annual city marathon today.

Runners from 27 different countries took part in this year's event which is now in its 13th year.

Dubliner Gary O'Hanlon from Clonliffe Harriers AC was first over the line, taking the title for the second year in a row.

He finished four minutes ahead of Tim O'Donoghue from East Cork AC to win in a time of 02.21.21.

Angela McCann from Clonmel AC was the first woman home in a time of 03.02.53.

The Leevale men’s team took the relay win with Togher AC’s Gavin Sweeney winning the half-marathon in a time of 1.09.04.

The first female home in the half-marathon was Fiona Santry from East Cork AC in a time of 1.23.17.

Among the relay teams taking part this year were some 350 sanctuary runners made up of runners from across the country and people living in Direct Provision.

Cork wheelchair athlete, Jerry Forde, took to the start line for his 450th marathon, while double lung transplant recipient, David Crosby, from Meath, and his medical team also took part in the relay.

David Crosby (second left) and his medical team who ran today’s team relay

Clonliffe Harriers' Gary O'Hanlon was the first to cross the winning line this morning.


Additional reporting Jennie O'Sullivan