The occupiers of Apollo House are demanding that homeless people receive private NAMA housing.

The Home Sweet Home group says it will be meeting Minister for Housing Simon Coveney tomorrow to discuss a number of demands.

The group has been ordered by the High Court to vacate Apollo House by next Wednesday.

But the group has published an Emergency Housing Plan which calls on the Government to declare a housing emergency and make housing a constitutional right.

It also wants the Government to build social housing and end mortgage repossession.

Spokesman Brendan Ogle said residents of Apollo House and official emergency hostels should receive private rooms.

He said that homeless people who do not need support for addiction or mental health should be given residential housing through NAMA.

Mr Ogle also said Home Sweet Home would not be registering as a charity or under Standards In Public Office legislation.

The group has received over €160,000 in donations but Mr Ogle, an organiser for UNITE trade union, said  Home Sweet Home is operating as a campaign under trade union legislation.

According to the Dublin Region Homeless Executive, 68 people have been assessed in Apollo House and 43 moved into emergency accommodation.

There are believed to be around 30 homeless people still staying in the office building.

But the Homeless Executive says another 50 beds will be available within a week.

Residents can stay up to six months before getting permanent accommodation.

They have 24-hour access and stay in rooms with up to four beds.

Carman's Hall in the south city is run by Dublin Simon and there are now 41 beds in the facility.

There are a total of 230 beds being provided in four new centres across the city with other organisations like the Fr Peter McVerry Trust and Depaul Ireland also involved.

The centres offer a 24-hour service and provide meals and have medical professionals and social workers as support services.