A new study by the Economic and Social Research Institute has found that increasing the minimum wage should not be expected to have a major impact on household poverty.

The ESRI says that workers on low hourly pay are often resident in households with incomes close to or even above average.

The ESRI study shows that more than 11 out of 12 low-paid workers live in households that are above the most commonly referenced poverty line.

It found that in the majority of cases, low-paid employees are not the sole earners in the household.

Even when they are the sole earners, fewer than one in five of them fall below the EU's "at risk of poverty" threshold.

The institute says these findings reflect patterns that are common in other countries and while minimum wage policies are pursued for many reasons, they should not be expected to have a major impact on household poverty.

While the current minimum wage stands at €9.15 an hour, the Irish Congress of Trade Unions has called for a 25% increase, changing it to a so-called 'living wage' of €11.50 per hour by the end of 2017.