Funeral takes place of murdered soldier Lee Rigby in England

Friday 12 July 2013 22.33
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Two-year-old Jack wore a t-shirt with a special message for his daddy
Two-year-old Jack wore a t-shirt with a special message for his daddy
Fusilier Rigby was murdered in Woolwich, southeast London
Fusilier Rigby was murdered in Woolwich, southeast London
Members of The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers march through Bury ahead of the
Members of The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers march through Bury ahead of the

The funeral of murdered British soldier Lee Rigby has taken place in Bury, England.

His young son, two-year-old Jack, wore a t-shirt with the words "My Daddy My Hero" on the back.

Fusilier Rigby was murdered in Woolwich, southeast London, as he returned to Woolwich barracks from the Tower of London on 22 May.

Members of the public applauded Fusilier Rigby's comrades and forces veterans as they arrived for the funeral service at Bury Parish Church, where comrades had maintained a guard of honour overnight.

Applause also greeted the 25-year-old's family, who joined about 800 mourners inside for the private service near his home town of Middleton, Greater Manchester.

British Prime Minister David Cameron, who told the Commons earlier this week that the whole of the UK will be mourning with the family, was among dignitaries attending the service.

London Mayor Boris Johnson also attended.

Fusilier Rigby had served in Afghanistan as a machine gunner and was attached to the regimental recruiting team when he was hacked to death in broad daylight in the street.

In his eulogy, Fusilier Rigby's commanding officer, Colonel Jim Taylor, said: "Fusilier Lee James Rigby, or Riggers to his friends in the Army, was an extremely popular soldier.

"A larger-than-life personality, he loved to perform and belonged in the Second Fusiliers' Corps of Drums. He was truly charismatic.

"He was always happy. His smile was infectious, as was his enthusiasm for soldiering and his passion for life.

"Lee proved himself to be dedicated, professional and incredibly brave," he said.

On return to the UK, Fusilier Rigby completed a second tour of public duties and moved with the battalion to Germany.

The soldier was with the Recruiting Group in London, where he also assisted with duties at Regimental Headquarters in the Tower of London, at the time of his murder.