Despite having had a number of drastic surgeries over the years Nikki Bradley is living a positive and adventurous life. Nikki joins Kathryn Thomas - filling in for Ray D'Arcy on RTÉ Radio 1 - to tell us her incredible story. Listen back above.

Calling in from Co. Derry, the Dublin-turned-Donegal woman told Kathryn of how she became ill at the age of 16, having noticed a lump in her hip in the summer of 2002.

"I was just a regular student, and in the space of the length of time it takes to have a conversation, my life changed forever," she explained. "I was given a diagnosis, Ewing sarcoma was the cancer I was diagnosed with. Just everything changed after that."

Ewing sarcoma is a rare form of cancer that affects bones or the tissue around bones, and is most likely to appear in children and young people.

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Having being told that the tumor was the size of her fist, Nikki had to travel between Dublin and the UK to undergo "a lengthy spell of chemotherapy" both before and after having the tumor surgically removed.

With the support of her family, she coped with a long list of side effects. Being a teenager, she says one of the biggest challenges was being plucked from society and putting life on hold.

"It was the side effects of the treatment that were harder to deal with: losing my hair, my sense of smell and my taste changing, and the big one of being 16 and leaving school. The day I was diagnosed, I was diagnosed in my school uniform and it was the last time I ever wore that uniform."

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Following her treatment, Nikki said she found herself back in society in her early 20s without any form of education or plan to move forward. Feeling left behind by her peers was made all the more difficult by the various issues she had with her hip following radiotherapy treatment.

"That laser going into the one spot on my body for that amount of time basically destroyed the bone in my hip. As recent as the 7th of February, when I finally had my amputation, I have spent the last 20 years having various surgeries to try and save my leg."

Despite two failed hip replacements, a broken femur from weakness in the bone, and coping with chronic pain, Nikki has managed to travel with friends around the globe and has become something of an adventurer.

Despite using crutches full-time since 2012, she has challenged herself to a number of physical feats such as the Four Peaks Challenge in Ireland and the gruelling 24km Fan Dance trek in Wales.

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In 2020, Nikki felt that her quality of life was deteriorating as she was experiencing severe pain throughout her lower back and neck stemming from problems in her hip. By now, following two hip replacements, the bone that was left was "nearly like chalk" and too badly damaged to work with.

Now in her mid-30s and living through a pandemic, Nikki realised that she didn't want to waste any more time being restricted in life, and made the tough decision to have a rotationplasty, an incredible surgery that sees a portion of the limb removed, rotated and reattached.

"In my case, they remove the hip and everything as far down as the knee. They then take the good part of the leg - which is from the knee down - rotate it 180 degrees and re-attach it where my hip once was."

"Essentially, at the moment, my knee is acting as my hip and my foot is acting as my knee joint. Which is such a strange thing to even say."

"My foot is back to front, essentially," she adds, "but when I get my prosthetic it act as my knee and it will all make sense."

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Although this incredible procedure is life-changing, Nikki says that it remains unpopular due to the visual aspect of it.

Searching for women her own age who had similar surgeries, Nikki said that the results were few and far between. Thanks to social media, she was able to find a New Zealand woman who had something similar, which Nikki says helped her to visualise what her life would look like after the surgery.

"Regardless of how it looks, I had to make that call to secure a positive future for myself. When you look at it like that, it makes it easier to make."

Although she lives life with an impressively positive attitude, Nikki admits that the adjustment period has been difficult and that she is still learning to get comfortable with her body.

"Over the months I have grown to get used to my leg," she says. "I'm not going to say, at this stage, that I love it, I think I'm a little bit away from that yet, but I know that I will eventually get completely used to it, and once I do start my journey with getting the prosthetic leg it will make that easier."

To listen to Nikki's fascinating chat with Kathryn on The Ray D'Arcy Show above.