Andrea Horan has quite the collection of titles. She is the owner of Dublin's trendiest nail salon, Tropical Popical; founder of The HunReal Issues; co-presenter of the United Ireland Podcast with Una Mullally; and co-founder of No More Hotels.

Recently, the Dublin woman added yet another stylish string to her likely-bedazzled bow when she took a seat on the Absolut Clubbing Council.

Working along side an assembly of key personalities in club culture, Absolut are working to support and protect the clubbing culture of Ireland by providing up-and-coming promoters with advice, mentorship and a grant of €10k to create their dream event.

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Considering how low a priority the night-life industry has been during the COVID-19 pandemic, Horan says that she hopes this initiative will spark new life in the Irish scene, and inspire a new wave of club-goers to break the mould when it comes to the clubbing structure:

"It's not about making it fancy or anything," she insists. "I'm just back from Homobloc in Manchester and it's literally in an abandoned warehouse with water dripping from the roof, and it's the perfect clubbing opportunity."

"It's not about trying to make it Celtic Tiger glam or whatever, it's about someone who can bring something to the table in clubbing that's a little different and can lead the way in clubbing and reinvigorate and reignite clubbing."

So, what does a dream night involve for the animal-print-clad activist?

"My dream club night is a big dark warehouse with a thumping beat and access to good toilets" she laughs. "And also that starts early and is full of Drag Queens."

But she adds: "It will be something that will be interesting for Ireland and something that could start something different happening, and pushing the boundaries. Giving people an insight to a different way that clubbing can be."

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Having torn up dancefloors across the country since the age of 15 (unbeknownst to her parents, of course), the glittery entrepreneur says that there is no doubt in her mind that clubbing has intrinsic value, and should at the very least be prioritised economically.

"We put so much investment into business here," she muses. "Clubbing is a business in itself so I think we need to change our thought process of seeing it as a frivolous nuisance and start looking at it as an industry and taking it seriously and invest in it and nurture it."

"We have a heritage of dance culture being supported and being highlighted and celebrated, and it was just kind of forgotten when we got into the Celtic Tiger years," she adds. "It is indicative that it is economically linked and then people bulldoze through it for things that they think are more valuable."

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Moving forward, Horan believes that in order for the nightlife industry to not only survive but thrive, those in the community will need to take ownership of venues so as not to depend on the whims of landlords.

"I think we need, as an industry, to start looking at owning spaces and creating cultural spaces. I also think that co-ops need to kick in a bit more in Ireland."

"They're a big thing around the world in terms of grocery shops and cultural spaces but I think there's an opportunity for clubs to start co-ops where all the members are funding the buying of the space and the running of it and are part of it."

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From structuring club nights to protecting cultural landmarks, it seems that politics and activism are key elements when it comes to carving out a space for Ireland's nightlife.

"From a government perspective, I think we're lucky that our Minister for Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht (Catherine Martin) is supportive of that," says Horan.

"You can definitely see the change that's come about from having her in that role and the support that has come through. From her just getting what clubbing is."

"It's so frustrating when politicians talk about clubbing," she adds. "No offence to Coppers - there's a time and a place for everything - but the minute clubs come up it's like, 'Oh Coppers'. That's a disco, it's not really a club."

"Until there's a differentiation from the clubbing experience and going to a disco, it's very difficult to pull out the cultural benefits."

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So, what exactly is the special something that clubbing has to offer? According to Horan, it all comes down to Collective Effervescence (CE).

First coined by Émile Durkheim, CE is a sociological concept whereby a community may simultaneously communicate the same thought and participate in the same action as a group - something that has been sorely absent in the time of lockdowns and social distancing.

"It's when you do a ritual all together and the energy that then starts transferring," Andrea explains. "When you have that, you're in a space that's so democratic. Race and creed and all that s**t goes out the window."

"When we're looking at politics and how divisive it is, when you have something that can bring people so together... we're looking for that in so many other spaces and it's literally here and it's happening in real time, and it's being overlooked as an opportunity to bring people together."

"Clubbing is culture to me because it's a ritual. It's a ritual I enjoy with the music I enjoy and the dancing, but it's also where I found my tribe."

If you have a club concept that you want Absolut & the Absolut Clubbing Council to support and fund it, apply with your We Are Made To Mix idea here.