It's been a busy summer for Aoibhín Garrihy, but you'd never think it to look at her. Between launching new sleep products through her wellness company, Beo, and welcoming her third child with husband John Burke, it's been all go for the presenter and entrepreneur.

When we speak over Zoom, she's still multitasking away, with month-old Isla on her lap and chattering between questions.

"We've been very lucky", she tells RTÉ Lifestyle about her recent trip to the maternity ward. "All went well, as well as we could have hoped for and we're still in the very early days.

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"She's just gone a month, so still adjusting to life as a family of five. The girls are taking to her really well, like too well to the point where I just have these visions of Hannorah coming down the stairs with her like at three years of age."

Chatting about her growing family, you'd be forgiven for thinking the cool, calm, collected mum of three has parenting sewn up, but she says herself that Isla has been the least fussy baby thus far. "She's thriving. I don't know whether it's just I'm more laid back or you stop kind of doubting yourself, or they get easier. She's come with the least amount of pressure moments."

It's just as likely, however, that Garrihy has become skilled at the art of finding peace in stressful moments. Central to this, she says, is her relationship to the coast. "I have always felt a huge connection to our coastline", she says.

Having grown up in Dublin, not beside the sea, she says the seaside life was "embedded" in her by her parents, who had both grown up in Clare and brought the family back West for every long weekend, bank holiday or summer trip.

Garrihy Seafoods is still a thriving family business, with her dad and uncles still fishing under the Cliffs of Moher with tourists.

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So it isn't lost on her how many people have found comfort in the sea since the pandemic. "We are an island surrounded by coastal waters and people have found a lot of therapy in that", she says.

"They've rediscovered all that our coastlines have to offer, not just in terms of food and nutrition, but also the benefits of swimming and what that does for people's mental health and the freedom that they enjoy when we feel that weightlessness. People really turned to Mother Nature."

For Garrihy, though, the sea has been a constant source of calm. "I've always had that draw. It never left my dad. I think anyone who grows up by the sea, it's a part of them. It's like cutting off a limb as soon as they move away."

It's part of her extended family, too, as her sister-in-law June Curtin founded Snámhaí Sásta, a swimming community of hundreds of people who meet at beaches across the country. "I see now this absolute movement, people travelling far and wide, even from the Midlands to get out to the coast and sea swim."

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Just like her father, she felt the pull back to the West after a few years of living away from it. "When I got into my 20s and I was honest with myself, I said that's where I need to be, why I'm pretending I don't?"

So what is the draw of the sea for her, and so many others? "It's just that letting go", she says. "You feel alive, all you have to focus on is keeping your head above water in that moment. Mother Earth was the unsung hero of the pandemic, whether it was the sea or the hills or just a walk."

During lockdown, Garrihy couldn't sea swim as the beach was outside her 5km radius, but like so many of us, she improvised, and stumbled upon one of the best hidden gems in the West, we reckon. "I found a lake here, on our doorstep within the 5km, Ballyalla Lake. I was there every week.

"But it wasn't the sea."

Garrihy has passed her love of the sea down to her children, who follow her down to the beach with buckets and spades. "That fresh air, it knocks them out!" she laughs. "When we spend a day inside doing arts and crafts or grass or watching Peppa, compared to a day by the sea, there's no comparison."

The presenter has brought her love of the sea to the fore as she teams up with Bord Bia to promote Irish whitefish, which is central to one of her go-to speedy bakes.

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"I was never a domestic goddess before. I'm starting to reinvest my time into that because I guess it's not myself I have to think about, it's the health of my kids. You're trying to introduce them to all kinds of foods from an early age.

"I've a back pocket hake bake that comes out when when the pressure on, that came from my mom. It's delicious. Few fillets of hake, throw in your fresh peppers and your onion and bit of fresh cream. We won't put too much cream in there, but a little bit. And it's really delicious. And we have it with steaming vegetables."

So where are her go-to swimming spots in the West of Ireland?

"We were at the Pollock Holes recently, I'd never been there before", she says. "It's not ideal with a buggy, a newborn and two toddlers who are tripping over their sandals because there's no sand. They came with their buckets and spades because we thought there was going to be sand", she laughs, "but it was ideal for swimming."

Clahane Beach is up there too, along with Spanish Point and White Strand. So take this as your prompt to get there before the golden hours get shorter and shorter!