There comes a scene in Phantom Thread, Paul Thomas Anderson's ode to obsessive fashion creatives, when Daniel Day-Lewis's Reynolds Woodcock sits down to discuss a gown with its future wearer. 

He asks her a series of either/or questions, personal ones and abstract ones, trying to sketch the dress from her personality. It's a serene moment, surreally intense and intimate and, it turns out, rather accurate when it comes to crafting bespoke gowns for the elite. 

Laura Jayne Halton, the Kildare designer who has created three Oscar dresses so far in her career, shared the reality of taking on such a creative challenge with the Sunday Independent

According to Halton, it can take up to 100 hours to create a dress, which comes after holding one-to-one interviews with her client. She explains that it's in this moment that she gets the "vibe" of the dress. 

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"Every time, it has always been the first design that I've sketched out. It must be in that moment. I just get a feel or a vibe of what will help them shine on their special night."

Ensuring her client's comfort and ease is one of Halton's top priorities, as she feels it's her job to "fuss over" the dress. 

As for the specific considerations that go into designing a dress that may have to stand up to a shiny gold statuette, hundreds of thousands of glittering lights and maybe even Brad Pitt, they are many

"Shiny fabrics are out because they don't tend to photograph well. You also have to think about fabrics that won't crease because the nominee can spend up to two hours beforehand sitting in the limo on the way there. Even though it's only a few kilometres from the hotel, there is a string of limos going into the event, and it's not like a stylist will be there when they get out so you have to pick fabrics that will fall gracefully and not hold a crease."

Halton had to contend with these factors all while creating her first Oscar dress from scratch in just five days. "I had to fly to London with the dress, which I minded like it was a child, then I spent about five hours hand-sewing the hem once we had fitted it with the heels." 

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Her clients in the past have included Nora Twomey (The Breadwinner) when she was went to the event for her film Song of the Sea, and for Fodhla Cronin O'Reilly, who was nominated for her short film Head Over Heels in 2013. 

As a small designer, Halton has seen a different and more complicated side to the #MeToo movement and its affects on those creating the gowns stars wear. As focus has been pushed away from questions about actresses' appearance and outfits - which can now be viewed as superficial or even sexist - Halton feels there is a greater struggle for smaller businesses trying to get their name out there. 

"Once you ask a woman about her job and her work first, then you can include a question about the dress because I think it's really unfair, especially for small designers who are creating pieces and putting all this blood, sweat and tears into the dress. For that person, most often the pay-off is the mention."