It's Easter so for no reason, apart from the obvious, we've decided to take a look at the top movies featuring Bunny rabbits that you can really sink your teeth into.

1. Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988)

This mix of live action and animation about a rabbit who's wrongly framed for the murder of a wealthy businessman remains a hoot. Of course it's still cherished by men of a certain age who had a very confused first crush over sultry Jessica Rabbit who uttered the immortal line - "I'm not bad, I'm just drawn that way".

2. Donnie Darko (2001)

There's not too many movies that feature a 6ft tall talking rabbit - but then again Donnie Darko wasn't exactly your average movie. Now regarded as a modern cult classic, the 2001 horror-thriller also introduced us to the very lovely Jake Gyllenhaal.

3. Monthy Python and the Holy Grail (1975)

This movie had everything. The Knights who say "Ni". Nymphomaniac maidens. sarcastic French sentries ("Your mother was a hamster and your father smelt of elderberries"), and, of course, a vicious killer rabbit i.e. the most foul, cruel and bad-tempered Lagomorph you ever set eyes on!

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4. Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit (2005)

If you don't like Wallace & Gromit then you're dead inside. Not only did this win the Oscar for Best Animated Feature - the first stop-motion film every to do so - but it's also joyous riot of fun and features our two heroes helping a village which is being plagued by a mutant rabbit. 

5. Watership Down (1978)

Now for a massive helping of misery. Generations of kids (and adults) have been scarred by this British animated movie which deals with the traumatic consequence of a rabbit warren faced with annihilation and doesn't pull its punches when it comes to death and violence. NEVER show this to children unsupervised.

6. Con Air (1997)

As box office bubblegum goes you can't ask for better than this hokum. Most of the cast chewed enough scenery to reduce the set to splinters, none more so than Nicholas Cage who demanded to "Put the bunny back in the box." It makes this scene a delicious guilty pleasure.

7. Harvey (1950)

Starring the great Jimmy Stewart, think of this as a prototype Donnie Darko. This movie tells the story of an eccentric man whose best friend is an invisible 6ft 3½" tall rabbit named Harvey. Fans of Celtic mythology will be delighted to know that Harvey was a púca. Begod!

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8. Sing Street (2016)

"What are you doing?" Just rabbit stuff.

Eamon may have been one of the supporting characters in this excellent Irish movie, but his rabbit obsession endeared him to us no end and made him our leading man. Now streaming on Netflix. If you haven't seen it, then hop to it!

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9. The Secret Life of Pets (2016)

He's cute, fluffy and a complete headbanger. The Kevin Hart voiced character of Snowball stole the show in this movie from last year. Expect a stand alone spin-off soon if there's any justice.

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10. Fatal Attraction (1987)

Of course, no bunny list could be complete without this. Yes, it's the jilted lover movie that gave the world the term 'bunny boiler' thanks to this charming scene.

John O'Driscoll