The Bluffer's Guide is a personal musical journey through influential genres and artists with DJ and writer Aidan Kelly. This week, Aidan takes on the history of ska...

There's a great scene in This Is England, the movie, when his mother says no, you cannot have Dr. Martens or turn-up Levis, and in a way, it's this turning point that gives ska music a reason for living, the word no, turning a Caribbean sound into a revolution sound.

Kent People - Laurel Aitken and Gravy Beats

Laurel Aitken arrives in England around 1960 and becomes known as the Godfather of Ska; he's a champion for the blue beat sound. Young Aitken had sung calypso songs. He moves to Leicester and becomes a mascot for the sound of disaffected youth, black and white, in the UK.

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Bob Marley and The Wailers - Simmer Down

It's a fact that ska couldn't have happened without the considerable influence of reggae and those other genres like blue beat and early dub. Without Bob Marley, too, that energy would have been different, so listening to his early release Simmer Down, it's a world away from his later rebellious material. A straight-up ska dance tune, you actually wouldn't know it was him.

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Mad Mad Riddim - Alton Ellis

The good looking Godfather of Rocksteady had much to say about rude boys and, of course, influenced ska much later on. He worked as a printer in Jamaica but got back into music, working on Treasure Isle Records and teaming up with the late, great John Holt.

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The Selecter - The Selecter

This opening instrumental featured heavily at the beginning of all my sets at Strictly Handbag in Ri-Ra around the late nineties. It served as a reminder that I was a real DJ and knew this ska music by heart; I came from a Northside perspective and proudly adopted this sound as mine. Then you find out about Pauline Black and, in general, what the music stood for and still means. It's another level.

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I Want Justice - Delroy Wilson

This lively number has an undertone; Wilson recorded this for the Wailers & Friends album around 1972 and with the help of the great Clement Dodd. It's on the Studio One Ska compilation, with many other greats.

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The Prince - Madness

Madness did become the most popular of the ska bands, seemingly always on Top of The Pops and smothered in the sense of humour that probably got on the others lads' nerves; Here's their ode to Prince Buster...

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The Beat - Stand Down Margaret

Initially, I loved The Beat's graphics. The red and black, the girl, the boy with the trilby, dancing eternally. I was at the special Beat gig in McGonagle's in 1989 when I got to go back to their party, probably because I had a bottle of vodka (and not my teenage banter). Stand Down Margaret sums up a great deal about ska - and politics - in the UK at that time.

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Full Moon Ska - Interskalactic

Infectious and Irish, with a great big band sound that could easily slot in with the Skatalites, covering not only Prince Buster and the classics but their own arrangements, too.

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Sally Brown - Bad Manners

I warmed up for Bad Manners in the Mean Fiddler and played a couple of tracks that didn't work - skinheads from Dublin are scary. I should have just stuck to Trojan tunes. Buster Bloodvessel later asked me to get him chicken wings, we ate like kings and all was forgiven.

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Shoulda, Coulda, Woulda - The Bionic Rats

Dublin wouldn't be complete without the rats. I'm missing their hi-octane sets in the Foggy Dew; they're just a part of the furniture, tighter than a tightrope, broader than Broadway...

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Ghost Town - The Specials

I lived in a place where my father's brother turned up the odd time with bags of groceries because he decided to strike like his workmates, his work was his life really, and his plight somehow coincided with ska for me. Ghost Town slipped into my love of radio, and I thanked Terry Hall personally for this; he may not remember. The music video was directed by Barney Bubbles and filmed in the East End of London, Blackwell Tunnel and a before-hours City of London Vauxhall.

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Scratch Walking - Lee Scratch Perry and The Upsetters

With all his wonderful craziness, you'd be forgiven for overlooking all of those great tracks he worked on, producing his brand of outer space soundtrack, even after his studio burned down.

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Broadway Jungle - Toots & The Maytals

The go-to group carved out something very different, cheerful and colourful, an outstanding live outfit, playing good times reggae.

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Lygon Street Meltdown - Melbourne Ska Orchestra

These guys (all 18 of them) are proving that distance and borders don't mean anything. Ska and skanking are alive and well in Australasia...

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The Whip - The Ethiopians

The original sound of the Ethiopians came to us in the mid-sixties. Earlier than the Lion of Judah himself, It has aged very, very well.

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On My Radio - The Selecter

This was my first introduction to The Selecter on BBC TV - and to see that clean-cut look and all of those threads I wanted blew my mind. Political and relevant, funky and upfront. No one can compare.

Listen to more from The Bluffer's Guide on RTÉ 2XM here.