We sat down with comedian and Bridget & Eamon star Ed Sammon to discuss his latest venture, The Cine Stream Podcast.

When COVID-19 came to Irish shores, and social distancing became the norm, live comedy became an impossibility. When the country was in dire need of a laugh, comics were pushed to transform their tight five into series-long podcasts, vital TikToks, interactive painting lessons, and online gigs.

As a result, podcasts became as popular as banana bread and sea swimming, but only some stood the test of time. One such gem is The Cine Stream Podcast.

Hosted by Trevor Browne and comedians Andrea Farrell and Edwin Sammon, this weekly fact-filled film chat take a cold hard look at the movies that society (and IMBD users) have deemed 'classics', and put them to the Cine Stream test.

Having previously hosted The Reviewables with Cian McGarrigle and Hannah Mamalis, and having launched his own podcast, Edwin Sammon of Knowledge, during lockdown, Ed is no stranger to the podcasting world, and found that he couldn't pass up the opportunity to start another despite the rampant competition.

"I started a podcast, and then Harry and Meghan started a podcast, then Obama started one and I just thought f**k this," Ed deadpans over the phone.

"My good friend Trevor Browne contacted me and proposed doing a podcast talking about movies with our other friend, Andrea," he explained. "We're all good mates and, before the pandemic, we would call over to each others houses and watch movies and have a few drinks so we wanted to get back to that."

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Every week the trio watch a beloved film, put the world of hand sanitiser and vaccines to the back of their minds, and battle out their opinions with "heated arguments and lukewarm takes".

"It's partially asking if these movies hold up but it's also about asking yourself if you would lock these movies in a vault for future generations to enjoy. It has to be something that you can watch numerous times; it's the equivalent of comfort food."

"It has to have a combination of nostalgia, but also be the best example of it's specific genre," he adds.

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Considering the hosts looks back at movies that are tied to their childhoods, the age at which they watched them seems... questionable. Pretty Woman and Jurassic Park, for example, seem to have been given the green light to young kids back in the 90s.

"Jurassic Park is quite scary and has Samuel L Jackson's severed arm in it," laughs Ed. "But my memory of watching that in The Savoy Cinema - having come up from the wilds of Offaly - is that there was a one year old sitting behind me laughing away at it while sitting on his dad's knee."

"I remember The Never Ending Story scaring me when I was a kid," he continues. "The wolf thing was terrifying. You watch it years later and it's just some dude with a wolf puppet and what disturbs me now is when the horse disappears into the quick sand. That scars me as an adult!"

"Movies change as you get older, so sometimes you look back and wonder why you used to love them so much."

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The ways in which we experience film has undeniably changed; streaming services are giving cinemas a run for their money, superhero franchises have overtaken rom-coms, parents are perhaps a little more cautious of what their kids watch, and the content that modern audiences find palatable has changed drastically.

"Some of the movies have really dated," agrees Ed. "And there seems to be a market for these articles that say 'We need to talk about Pretty Woman' and talk about how the movies were a bit dodgy, but I can personally separate the issues from the time period."

"Certainly, if they made that movie today, it wouldn't be the same but that kind of gives it a charm. It's unfortunate that we have to think of it as problematic rather than accepting it was made in 1990 and you just focus on how charming Julia Roberts is and how not charming Richard Gere is."

"Saying it was of it's time is not excusing the problematic nature of a lot of the aspects of these movies, we're not just saying it's grand," he clarifies, laughing.

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So, with all of the above in mind, what movies are making it into the vault for Ed?

"Well, here's an exclusive. Eventually, we want to do this as a live show with an audience so, once we get that down, we want to cover some of our favourites. I would probably start with Goodfellas because, for me, it is one of those movies that I would always watch if it came on TV, even if it was already 20 minutes in."

With an 8.7 rating on IMDB, it's a solid start to the vault.

Season 2 of The Cine Stream Podcast is launching this Thursday, July 1st with the trio covering Independence Day ahead of July 4th.