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Album Review: The Temperance Movement

1 of 1 Their debut sounds like the work of men who've done three sets a night, six nights a week in some Hamburg sweatbox for the last three years. And then some.
Their debut sounds like the work of men who've done three sets a night, six nights a week in some Hamburg sweatbox for the last three years. And then some.

Your new favourite band? Harry Guerin thinks so.

The doom bell for the album rings ever louder, and yet every week there's a find to fill you with hope.

Scotsman-fronted, London-based blues rockers The Temperance Movement have only been together since the tail end of 2011, but their debut sounds like the work of men who've done three sets a night, six nights a week in some Hamburg sweatbox for the last three years. And then some.

Lovers and Fighters is the name of one of the standout tracks and also the quintet's MO, switching from backroom boogie to ballads, with singer Phil Campbell's pipes perfect for the tearaway and the tender - if the man swaggers on stage he's one of the few who can actually get away with it.

Guitarists Paul Sayer and Luke Potashnick, meanwhile, play off each other like a beautiful partnership in the making, with their solos achieving what so many in modern rock fail to do, namely stick in the mind. The joys don't end there either as the engine room work of bassist Nick Fyffe and drummer Damon Wilson has been rewarded in the mix. It's that kind of record and those kind of goosebumps.

Drink it all in.

4/5

The Temperance Movement

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