Scullion seeks black card to curb cynical fouling

Updated: Thursday, 21 Mar 2013 12:12

Four-time All Star and member of the Football Review Committee Tony Scullion has said he wants to see the proposal for the black card passed at this weekend's Annual Congress to curb cynical fouling.

Scullion was part of the FRC that mooted the initiative in a bid to halt intentional fouling that hampers the flow of the game.

Scullion told RTÉ: "For people there is a lot of talk about the black card. There is a lot of talk for it, there is talk against it.

"I just hope and pray the black card gets through. I’ve been lucky enough to play the game and I’ve been lucky enough to coach in the game.

"I was involved in this committee with Eugene (McGee) and the rest of the members and the general consensus of the GAA people, from the people that have come back to us, is they want this cynical play wiped out of our game.

"This cynical play is knocking our game back and I firmly believe that if we can get the black card in operation then our game will be much better for it."

Scullion added: "I'm not saying cynical play is coached on the training field, but smart players, who play at county level, they know when to give away the free and when to not give away the free.

"Every player has every right to play by the rule book. I played the game many years ago and I gave away frees at times when it was better for the team.

"There are times when you have to take the card or the tick. There are smart players out there and they know they are playing within the rules.

"We would like to slightly change those rules to see more attacking play, more good movement and good kicking and good scores. It will allow our skilful players to play the game."

Under the proposals, any black card shown to a player would result in a mandatory substitution. If a team receives three black cards during a match, any subsequent cards will result in a player leaving the pitch with no replacement allowed.

Offences likely to incur a black card from the referee include deliberatively pulling down an opponent or tripping an opponent with a hand, arm or foot.