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Luis Suarez admits to diving against Stoke but says foreign players are treated differently

Updated: Thursday, 17 Jan 2013 14:53 | Comments

Luis Suarez admits he dived against Stoke earlier this season
Luis Suarez admits he dived against Stoke earlier this season

Controversial Liverpool striker Luis Suarez admits that he did dive earlier this season in a Premier League match but believes foreign players are treated differently in England.

In an interview with Fox Sports Latin America, the Uruguayan said he often made headlines because his name sold newspapers.

Liverpool's top scorer, who has netted 15 Premier League goals this season - two behind the league's leading marksman Robin van Persie - owned up to diving against Stoke City at Anfield on 7 October.

"I think that on the pitch you have reactions where you ask yourself ‘What the hell did I do?’.

"I was criticised for diving for a ball against Stoke and I did throw myself there," he said.

"I'll be sincere, I did dive there because we were anxious against Stoke at home and wanted to come up with something."

The match ended goalless.

Suarez also believes foreign players are treated differently in England.

He said: "It's tough. As Carlitos (Carlos Tevez) and Kun (Sergio Aguero) said, the foreigners, and even more the South Americans, receive different treatment than the local ones.

"It's a cultural thing. They have different behaviours.

"What we have to do is play football, do what we know, what we've always desired. We fought to be here, and suffered a lot to be here. We shouldn't listen to any nonsense they say now."

Suarez has angered opposition managers, players and fans alike who feel he goes to ground too easily. Swansea City defender Ashley Williams said last year he "dived more than any other player I've played against".

The 25-year-old came under fire again earlier this month when he netted Liverpool's second goal after a clear handball in the FA Cup match against minor league Mansfield Town.

"I don't forget that I have a family and a daughter, and, no matter what happens during the day, when I get home I have a huge happiness and nothing else matters" - Luis Suarez

Liverpool manager Brendan Rodgers said Suarez had unintentionally handled but the player was greeted by "cheat" headlines in the British media the following day.

Suarez said: "I realise that Suarez sells, because the other day a ball hit my hand unintentionally and I didn't even feel like scoring the goal and I hit (the ball) just to hit it, but then, because I kissed my wrist, the criticism started.

"If Suarez sells then they're going to say that in the dressing room (for example) Suarez spoke in secret in front of Steven Gerrard.

"They'll invent anything. (The media) should dedicate themselves to talking about football and not about each player's attitude."

Suarez has been no stranger to controversy since joining Liverpool from Ajax Amsterdam in January 2011.

He served an eight-match ban for racially abusing Manchester United's Patrice Evra and later angered United manager Alex Ferguson by failing to shake the French defender's hand before their league match in February last year, the first time the players had met since the ban.

Ferguson branded Suarez a "disgrace to Liverpool" but the player said he paid no attention to what others said about him.

The Uruguyan said: "If someone comes to me and insults me, saying I'm South American, I won't start to cry," he added. "It's something that happens on the field - football things. My conscience is completely calm.

"As I said, United handle the press here. They have a lot of power and they always help them. If I listen to what the people say, I wouldn't be here or play football. If I listen what one or another says, it's very tough.

"I don't forget that I have a family and a daughter, and, no matter what happens during the day, when I get home I have a huge happiness and nothing else matters."

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