/ Sailing

Re-shuffle for Green Dragon crew

Updated: Friday, 05 Feb 2010 10:52

The Green Dragon crew are heading to Sweden next
The Green Dragon crew are heading to Sweden next

For Leg 8 of the Volvo Ocean Race Green Dragon will have two crew changes as part of their on going crew rotation.

Chinese media crew member Guo Chuan will step down for the next leg from Galway to Marstrand.

Guo has been with the team since their initial training in Ireland last summer, and has sailed on every leg of the race so far. Stepping onboard to carry out the media role will be Green Dragon cameraman Huang Jian.

Huang (also known by his English name James) has been part of Green Dragon media team on shore since the start of the race in Alicante and this will be his first time onboard for a leg of the race.

Also stepping back onboard will be Green Dragon’s boat captain James Carroll, he will replace Ian Budgen who joined he crew for the transatlantic leg from Boston to Galway.

Skipper Ian Walker said of Guo: ‘Guo has been with us since the every beginning, he has done an amazing job onboard with the crew. I was so proud for him to be nominated for the media award during the Leg 7 prize giving.

‘This will be his first trip home since our arrival in Qingdao in January and he really deserves this opportunity to recharge the batteries. Arriving into Galway was a huge moment for the whole team and just as the boat completed its circumnavigation, Guo also completed his own lap of the planet.

‘Huang Jian has been traveling as part of the Green Dragon team since Alicante, it will be a fantastic opportunity for him, he is an exceptional cameraman and the boys are looking forward to having him onboard.’

Leg 8 Galway to Marstrand, 525 nm

In a change of pace to the previous transatlantic leg from Boston, Leg 8 will see the fleet take on the first of the short sprint legs, as they sail the 950 miles from Galway to Marstrand in Sweden.

The boats will leave Galway Bay and head south along the west coast of Ireland, then south-east across the Irish Sea to the south coast of England. The course will then see them head eastwards up the English Channel, and then turn the corner to head north into the North Sea, eventually ending up in the the entrance to the Baltic Sea.

The fleet could face some low pressure systems along the course, but the high pressure and light airs common at this time of year could also cause the fleet some issues.

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