The History Show

The History Show

Sunday, 6pm

The History Show Sunday 7 May 2017

The History Show

The History Show

Bringing the past to life! Discover how our world was shaped as Myles Dungan and guests explore events ranging from medieval times to the recent past

The History Show 7th May 2017

This week, historians give a roasting to Charles de Gaulle; Edward Carson; and Michael Cusack; award-winning musician, Daoirí Farrell, brings to life songs of the Irish revolution; we hear a brief history of Irish clothes, dating back ten thousand years; and with Emmanuel Macron apparently on the brink of becoming France’s youngest ever President, we’ll look at history’s youngest ever leaders.

History's Youngest Ever Leaders

History's Youngest Ever Leaders

By the end of this week’s show, a result should be known in the Presidential Election in France which – we’re told – is likely to see Emmanuel Macron elected as the country’s youngest ever leader.  So we’ve asked writer and broadcaster, Jonathan Creasy, to take a look at some of history’s youngest ever leaders: from Alexander the Great to Mary Queen of Scots.

Speaking Ill of the Dead

Speaking Ill of the Dead

On June 22nd, The History Show will be supporting a day-long series of talks at Hinterland Festival in Kells, Co, Meath, which Myles is involved with running.  It’s called Speaking Ill of the Dead and, throughout the day, well-known historians will each choose an historical victim to speak ill of.  Reporter, Lorcan Clancy, speaks to three historians [Catriona Crowe; Jennifer Wellington; and Paul Rouse] who’ll be taking part, about their intended victims: Edward Carson; Charles de Gaulle; and Michael Cusack.  Further details on the event below.  For full details, click here for the website and click here for the Facebook page.

Songs of the Irish Revolution

Songs of the Irish Revolution

Music historian, archivist and uilleann piper, Terry Moylan, has unearthed and collected 566 Irish poems and songs of the Irish revolution [written between 1887 – 1926], for his recent book The Indignant Muse.  It is a "herculean effort" according to historian Gearóid Ó Tuathaigh, and we’re celebrating this week on The History Show by speaking to Terry, and by hearing - performed live by Daoirí Farrell - some of the songs included in the collection.  Last month, Daoirí won TWO awards at the BBC Folk Awards in the Royal Albert Hall, where he performed alongside Billy Bragg and Ry Cooder.  Click here for more details of Daoirí’s current album, True Born IrishmanClick here for more details of Terry’s book, The Indignant Muse.

A Brief History of Irish Clothes

A Brief History of Irish Clothes

It’s thought that humans may have begun wearing clothing as far back as 10 to 50,000 years ago.  But very little is known about Irish clothes before the twelfth century.  Reporter, Liam Geraghty, has been taking a look at Irish clothing through the ages, trying to find out why it’s a part of history that’s tricky to stitch together.  Click here for more details about Mice HellClick here for more details about Deirdre McQuillan’s book The Aran Sweater. Click here for details about the National Museum exhibition The Way We Wore

Ronan McGreevy on Willie Redmond

Ronan McGreevy on Willie Redmond

This day next month [7th June 2017] marks one hundred years since the death of Willie Redmond - the son of a Home Rule MP; the younger brother of Irish Parliamentary Party leader, John Redmond; and an MP himself – for East Clare.  His death in 1917 led to the by-election which saw Eamon de Valera elected for the first time.  In this column for The History Show, author and journalist, Ronan McGreevy, has been reflecting on the death – one hundred years ago – of Willie Redmond.  Ronan McGreevy is an Irish Times journalist and the author of Wherever the Firing Line Extends: Ireland and the Western Front.  An updated paperback version of his book with a foreword by Mary McAleese and a new chapter on Passschendaele will be published on May 10th.  Click here for more details about the book.   A special Irish Times supplement on the Irish involvement in the Battles of Messines Ridge and Passchendaele will be published in on May 17th.

Full line-up for Speaking Ill of the Dead

Full line-up for Speaking Ill of the Dead

The historians contributing at the Hinterland Festival on 22nd June, and their intended victims...

Catriona CroweEdward Carson – barrister, cabinet minister, unionist leader who began his public life as prosecutorial tormenter of Parnellites in the 1880s, became Oscar Wilde’s nemesis before leading the unionist opposition to Home Rule from 1912

Eamon Darcy (Maynooth University) – James Butler, Duke of Ormonde – Royalist warlord, leader of the Cavalier forces in Ireland against the army of Oliver Cromwell. Although Earl of Ormond, he became Duke of Ormonde. So how did he acquire the ‘e’.

Myles Dungan - Richard Pigott – the journalist, pornographer and conman who sold his newspapers to the Land League in 1881 and became the most notorious forger of the nineteenth century when he implicated Parnell in the Phoenix Park murders.

Diarmuid Ferriter (University College, Dublin) - Archbishop John Charles McQuaid – whether as President of Blackrock College or Archbishop of Dublin, McQuaid wielded pen and crozier in the service of the Roman Catholic Church and 19th century values.

Peter Frankopan (Oxford University) - Bohemond I of Antioch – leader of the First Crusade, who was, literally, a bastard. His involvement in the First Crusade probably had less to do with regaining the Holy Land for Christianity than with gaining some less holy land for Bohemond.

Glen Gendzel (San Jose State University) – ‘Mr.Dooley’ – the fictional creation of the great Chicago journalist Finley Peter Dunne, was an Irish bartender who did not have a good word to say about anybody in American public life in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Paul Rouse (University College, Dublin) – Michael Cusack – co-founder of the Gaelic Athletic Association in 1884, himself an excellent athlete, but not such a good role model or all round great guy.

Jennifer Wellington (University College, Dublin) – Charles de Gaulle – soldier and statesman, leader of the French resistance movement in WW2, first President of the Fifth Republic, arch conservative progenitor of the student/worker Paris riots of 1968, but was he right to say ‘Non’ to the UK entering the EEC?

For full details, click here for the website and click here for the Facebook page.

About The Show

Bringing the past to life! Discover how our world was shaped as Myles Dungan and guests explore events ranging from medieval times to the recent past.

We want to help explain ourselves to ourselves. We will search out fresh angles on familiar topics, seek out the unfamiliar and will not shy away from bizarre or controversial issues. Our ultimate goal is to make The History Show the primary port of call for those with an intense or even a modest interest in the subject. We want to entice the casual and the curious to join us in celebrating the past.

Our aim is to create informative, reflective, stimulating and above all, entertaining radio.

Join us on Sundays from 6.05pm for The History Show with Myles Dungan on RTÉ Radio 1.

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Presenter: Myles Dungan

Producer: Alan Torney

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