RTE Radio 1 Music

    Playlist 18th November 2013

    A LIST

    REMEMBER ME – GAVIN JAMES         IRISH

    LONG TIME GONE - BILLY JOE ARMSTRONG & NORAH JONES

    QUEENIE EYE – PAUL MCCARTNEY  

    THE MAN WHO WANTS - AMOS LEE  

    WHO’S TO SAY IT IS – LOUISE KILLEEN   IRISH

    MY LIGHTHOUSE –THE VILLAGERS                         NEW IRISH

    LIGHTENING AND THUNDER – DEADY                NEW IRISH

    FIVE HUNDRED MILES – JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE, CAREY MULLIGAN AND STARK SANDS

    COULD BE THE WEATHER – THE WOULD BES             NEW IRISH

    COWARDS CORNER – LISA O’NEILL           NEW IRISH

    Simple Things – Simple Things Collective IRL New

    B LIST

    GREAT WALL OF CHINA – JACK L   IRISH

    ANOTHER IS WAITING – THE AVETT BROTHERS

    GIRLS – THE 1975  

    WHEN TWO WORLD COLLIDE – CHAS AND DAVE  

    LET ME GO - GARY BARLOW    

    SING TO THE MOON – LAURA MVULA      

    TAKE ME TO THE CHURCH – HOZIER                       NEW IRISH

    TURN OFF THE SILENCE –ROISIN O AND MUNDY             NEW IRISH

    MAYBE – THE HENRY GIRLS                   NEW IRISH

    CARNIVAL STATION – THE CARNIVAL BROTHERS                  

    11. SOMEONE LIKE YOU – ADRIAN DUFFY & THE MAYO BOYS     NEW IRISH

    Recommended

    CAVALIER – JAMES VINCENT MCMORROW          IRISH

    EVERYBODY’S MUSIC – THE BARLY MOB                IRISH

    RAINBOX – TRACK DOGS                                              IRISH

    MARRIED TO MUSIT – FIACH MORIARTY               IRISH

    DOWN ON THE BAYOU – ROBERT MIZZELL

    IF ONLY I – NOWHERE MAN & WHISKEY GIRL

    HOOK , LINE & SINKER – THE SHOOS                        IRISH

    DOWN DOWN THE DEEP RIVER – OKKERVIL RIVER

    LET IT ROLL – BRENDAN QUINN & THE KICKIN’ MULE       IRISH

    SOMEWHERE ONLY WE KNOW – LILY ALLEN

    Album of The Week: Amos Lee: Mountains of Sorrow, Rivers of Song

    This weeks album of the week is Amos Lee: Mountains of Sorrow, Rivers of Song

    With his dusty voice and populist Americana, more real and current than the more retro-leaning members of the oeuvre, Amos Lee straddles the real estate staked out by Levon Helm, Little Feat and John Prine. In his songs, wonder isn’t wide-eyed, but knowing—and that makes the emotional charge more resonant.

    His elegiac title track, sweeping dignity in the face of how hard life and respiteful death can be, finds Lee tangling his earthy tenor with Patty Griffin’s wire-and-sky soprano for a plainspoken tribute to those who make it work by their own two hands, confessing as a funeral procession goes by: “And I have a cabin of solitude/ I built it with my own hands, it’s quite crude/ Ain’t much to it, this I know/ But I won’t leave too much behind here when I go/ I’ll be seeking my fortunes, carryin’ on/ Past the mountains of sorry and rivers of song…”

    That self-reliance is a potent theme. The techno-shuffling “Loretta,” with plenty of room for the Philadelphia native’s midrange to twist into soulful drifts, witnesses to a self-possessed woman who knows respect starts with her own fine self. The homage is equally reverential and desirous, and it works.

    Jay Joyce, recently striking success with country progressive Eric Church, isn’t afraid of Lee’s funkier side. He takes the singer/songwriter into a tangy bit of horns, steamy female singers and clavinet to rave like a more wide-open Lenny Kravitz on “The Man Who Wants You” and the atmospheric “Indonesia,” where Lee’s ether-like tenor poses the yearning “When will I be free…” as some kind of homing pigeon of the heart.

    For all its R&B undertow, gris-gris glory and soul shuffles, the Mountain’s essence is the acoustic-grounded, folk and country excavations. Whether it’s the gently finger-picked “Dresser Drawer,” with room for the desolation of its post-busted marriage lament, or the Guy Clark-worthy sweeping Texas meditation on progress and its price “Johnson Blvd,” featuring Willie Nelson vet Mickey Raphael’s plangent harmonica, Lee makes sorrow shimmer.

    That ache gets embroidered by Nashville’s very finest—dobroist Jerry Douglas, mandolinist Jed Hughes and a silvery vocal from Alison Krauss—on “Chill In The Air,” another song about trying to break the ties of a love that’s gone, but not quite releasing the abandoned. Like Jackson Browne for another generation, Lee understands the staining traces of love—drawing on small details like a woman’s breath falling softly on his chest while they slept.

    Spending his career exploring the American songbook’s capacity to hold his emotional tides, Amos Lee distills his essence. Ranging from old-timey to reverential, soul to Appalachian, Mountain stands utterly his.

     

    RTÉ Radio 1 Music Policy

    To complement the wide range of music on the RTÉ Radio 1 schedule, and to ensure our audience is kept abreast of contemporary music, a playlist system is in operation featuring the best of the current albums and singles. The tracks are rotated over the main daytime programmes and are updated every week.

    Tracks from the Radio 1 Album of the Week can be heard over the week on Risin' Time, The Ronan Collins Show and Late Date.

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