The Book On One

    Monday to Friday, 11.10pm

    Book on One 2013 Archive

     'CAna‘First, I’ll tell about the robbery our parents committed. Then about the murders, which happened later.’
    So begins Richard Ford’s most recent novel ‘Canada’ which tells the story of 15-year-old Dell Parsons, and the impact that his parents’ actions have on the course of his life.
    ‘Canada’ by Richard Ford is published by Bloomsbury.
    'Canda‘First, I’ll tell about the robbery our parents committed. Then about the murders, which happened later.’
    So begins Richard Ford’s most recent novel ‘Canada’ which tells the story of 15-year-old Dell Parsons, and the impact that his parents’ actions have on the course of his life.
    ‘Canada’ by Richard Ford is published by Bloomsbury.
    ‘First, I’ll tell about the robbery our parents committed. Then about the murders, which happened later.’
     So begins Richard Ford’s most recent novel ‘Canada’ which tells the story of 15-year-old Dell Parsons, and the impact that his parents’ actions have on the course of his life.
    ‘Canada’ by Richard Ford is published by Bloomsbury.'canda'AAadfd?

    'Happiness' by Mary Lavin, read by the author - Monday 30 December- Friday 3 January.
     
    On 7 October 1979, Mary Lavin and the American poet Elizabeth Bishop were scheduled to read together at the Sanders Theatre in Harvard University, at an event organised by Ploughshares Literary Magazine.
     
    When Elizabeth Bishop died unexpectedly the day before, the event became a tribute to her, during which Mary Lavin read her short story 'Happiness.'
     
    That reading of 'Happiness' was broadcast for the first time on The Book on One last January.  It begins with Mary introducing the story to the audience, by describing how she came to write it.
     
    This recording is broadcast on The Book on One by special permission of the Lavin literary estate, and Ploughshares Literary Magazine.
     
    The 1979 event at Harvard was organised by the founders of Ploughshares - DeWitt Henry and Peter O'Malley. You can visit the journal's website at www.pshares.org
     
    'Happiness and Other Stories' by Mary Lavin is published by New Island.

    Oscar Wilde's Stories for Children, 23, 26 and 27 December 2013.

    This week The Book on One features three of Oscar Wilde's best known stories for children.

    On Monday, December 23rd the late David Kelly reads 'The Selfish Giant'.

    On St. Stephen's Day, Alan Stanford reads 'The Happy Prince' and then on Friday, December 27th Bill Golding reads 'The Nighingale and the Rose'.

    'Pride and Prejudice’ by Jane Austen, read by Karen Ardiff - 
    16-20 December

    ‘It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife…’
    So begins one of Jane Austen’s best-loved novels, which celebrates its 200th birthday this year.

    Throughout the week listeners to The Book on One will be treated to the tale of the relationship between Austen’s feisty heroine Elizabeth Bennet and the aloof Mr Darcy.

    'A Rich Soup with Additional Material' by Brian Farrington, read by the author 9-13 December.

    In Farrington's memoir, he remembers his childhood in Ireland, his days in Paris where he spent time with Brendan Behan and lived with an extraordinary family and the 12 years he spent living in a left wing commune outside Paris....a time of great joy but also great sadness.
    'A Rich Soup with Additional Material' is published by Linden Press.
     

    'First Love’ by Ivan Turgenev, read by Robert O'Mahoney 2-6 December.

    Turgenev’s novella ‘First Love’ was published in 1860. In it, the narrator Vladimir remembers falling in love for the first time as a sixteen year old with his  new neighbour Zinaida.
     
    The translation is by Richard Freeborn and it's published by Oxford World's Classics.
     
    'The Herbalist' by Niamh Boyce, read by Caitríona Ní Mhurchú 25-29 November.

    The Book on One this week is 'The Herbalist' by Niamh Boyce, a story about a group of women in 1930s Ireland and the effect an enigmatic stranger has on all their lives.
    The reader is Caitríona Ní Mhurchú.

    'The Herbalist' is published by Penguin.
     

    'Twenty Years a Growing' by Muiris Ó Súilleabháin, read by Dónall Farmer 18-22 November.

    This week marks the 60th anniversary of the evacuation of the Great Blasket Island. And to mark that event, this week’s Book on One is the English language version of Muiris Ó Súilleabháin’s famous Blasket memoir, ‘Fiche Bliain ag Fás’ or ‘Twenty Years a Growing’.

    Muiris Ó Súilleabháin was born in 1904. His mother died when he was a baby and he spent the first few years of his life in an instituation in Dingle, before his family came to bring him back home to the Great Blasket Island. He left the island to join An Garda Síochána in 1927. He died in 1950.

    'Fiche Bliain ag Fás' was first published in 1933 and the English language version followed in the same year.

    The translation is by Moya Llewellyn Davies and George Thomson and it's published by Oxford.

    These readings were first broadcast in December 1986.

    'Sleepwalker' by John Toomey, read by Damian Kearney 11-15 November.
    John Toomey's novel tracks a turbulent week in the lives of a group of 20 somethings in Celtic Tiger Ireland.

    'Sleepwalker' is published by Dalkey Archive Press.

    'The Visitor' by Maeve Brennan, read by Doireann Ní Bhriain 4-8 November.

    Maeve Brennan's novel about the return home of Anastasia King was broadcast to mark the 20th anniversary of Maeve Brennan's death.

    'The Visitor' is published by New Island.

    'Hello Mr. Bones' by Pat McCabe, read by the author 28 October- 1 November.

    A scary story for Halloween, Pat McCabe reads 'Hello Mr. Bones' from his book 'Hello and Goodbye'.

    'Hello and Goodbye' is published by Quercus

    'Odour of Chrysanthemums' and 'Smile' by D.H. Lawrence, read by Robert O'Mahoney 21-25 October.

    Two short stories by D.H. Lawrence. 'Odour of Chrysanthems' runs from Monday to Thursday and then 'Smile' is on Friday.

    'Emma Brown' by Clare Boylan, read by Susan Fitzgerald 14-18 October.

    When Charlotte Bronte died in 1855, she had begun a new novel. The two chapter fragment introduced to English literature a lost girl who goes by the name of Matilda Fitzgibbon. Almost 150 years later, Clare Boylan returned to this intriguing beginning and turned the unfinished manuscript into an astonishing story of mystery, atmosphere and page turning suspense. While true to the narrative style of Charlotte Bronte, Emma Brown bears all the wit and pathos of Clare Boylan who has seamlessly developed Bronte's story of a girl without a past into a remarkable portrait of Victorian society with a shameful secret at its heart.

    'Emma Brown' by Clare Boylan is published by Little, Brown.

    'The Riddle of the Sands' by Erskine Childers, read by Damian Kearney-7-11 October.

    The Book on One this week features a book described as ‘the first modern thriller’. First published in 1903, ‘The Riddle of the Sands’ by Erskine Childers is a tale of espionage about two friends, Carruthers and Davies, whose supposededly innocent sailing trip turns into something much more sinister and dangerous.  ‘The Riddle of the Sands’ was hugely popular when it was first published but its author never wrote another novel. Childers was executed during the Civil War in 1922.

    ‘The Riddle of the Sands’ is published by Penguin.

    The Bob Dylan Encyclopedia Greatest Hits', read by the author-  Monday 30th Sept to Friday 4th October 2013

    To coincide with Big Music Week, the Book on One this week features Michael Gray reading from his book “The Bob Dylan Encyclopedia Greatest Hits”, which covers his life, his career and the hit songs which have brought him legendary status.

    'The Bob Dylan Encyclopedia Greatest Hits' is published by Continuum International.

    'Plough Music' by David Medcalf, read by the author- 23-27 September.

    To conincide with the National Ploughing Championships, the Book on One this week features David Medcalf reading from his book, Plough Music, a collection of pen pictures, wry observations, anecdotes and reflections on ploughing and the cultivation of the land.

    'Plough Music' is published by Liberties Press

    ‘Apparition & Late Fictions’ by Thomas Lynch, read by Gary Murphy – 17 to 21 June
    The first book of prose fiction from poet and essayist Thomas Lynch includes the novella ‘Apparition’, about a Methodist minister who finds success as a relationship guru following his divorce from his adulterous wife.
    ‘Apparition & Late Fictions’ is published by Jonathan Cape.
    ‘A Place Near Heaven’ by Damien Enright, read by the author – 10 to 14 June
    ‘A Place Near Heaven’ is the story of a calendar year in West Cork, told in month-by-month observations of the natural world.
    ‘A Place Near Heaven’ is published by Gill & MacMillan.
    ‘Paddle: A Long Way Around Ireland’ by Jasper Winn, read by the author – 3 to 7 June
    One summer, writer and musician Jasper Winn set himself the challenge of kayaking the whole way around Ireland - a journey of one thousand miles. But it turned out to be the worst Irish summer in living memory.
    ‘Paddle: A Long Way Around Ireland’ by Jasper Winn is published by Sort Of Books: www.sortof.co.uk
    ‘Solace’byBelindaMcKeonreadssssy, The Book on One this week features her final novel, ‘A Week in Winter’ which she finished just before her death in July 2012. ‘A Week in Winter’ is set in a small Irish town on the Atlantic Coast of Ireland. It tells the story of Geraldine Starr, known to everyone as Chicky, who leaves Stoneybridge as a young woman, only to return twenty years later to turn the rambling old Stone House into a hotel, a project which changes her life as well as those who come to visit.
    A Week in Winter is published by Orion Books.
    As d‘A Week in Winter’ by Maeve Binchy, read by Kate Binchy
    29 July- 2 August
    To mark the first anniversary of the death of the much-loved writer Maeve Binchy, The Book on One this week features her final novel, ‘A Week in Winter’ which she finished just before her death in July 2012. ‘A Week in Winter’ is set in a small Irish town on the Atlantic Coast of Ireland. It tells the story of Geraldine Starr, known to everyone as Chicky, who leaves Stoneybridge as a young woman, only to return twenty years later to turn the rambling old Stone House into a hotel, a project which changes her life as well as those who come to visit.
    A Week in Winter is published by Orion Books.

    ‘A Week in Winter’ by Maeve Binchy, read by Kate Binchy
    29 July- 2 August
    To mark the first anniversary of the death of the much-loved writer Maeve Binchy, The Book on One this week features her final novel, ‘A Week in Winter’ which she finished just before her death in July 2012. ‘A Week in Winter’ is set in a small Irish town on the Atlantic Coast of Ireland. It tells the story of Geraldine Starr, known to everyone as Chicky, who leaves Stoneybridge as a young woman, only to return twenty years later to turn the rambling old Stone House into a hotel, a project which changes her life as well as those who come to visit.
    A Week in Winter is published by Orion Books.

    ? by Aidan O’Hare – 27 to 31 May
    Belinda McKeon’s award-winning debut novel tells the story of Mark Casey, a doctoral student at Trinity College who is struggling with the demands of writing his thesis and helping out on the family farm at home in the midlands. His is a life without focus until he meets a young woman at a party.
    ‘Solace’ by Belinda McKeon is published by Picador.

    'The Best of Everything’ by Rona Jaffe, read by Megan Riordan - 16-20 September

    Rona Jaffe’s debut novel, which caused a scandal when it was first published in 1958, follows the lives of four young women who move to New York looking for romance and hoping to build their careers.

    'The Best of Everything' by Rona Jaffe is published by Penguin.

    ‘Blood, Sweat and Tears- An Irish Soldier’s Story of Love and Loss’ by Tom Clonan, read by the author - 9-13 September. 

    Irish Troops have served 40,000 individual tours of duty over four decades in Lebanon. Tom Clonan was stationed in the Lebanon in the mid 1990s and ‘Blood, Sweat and Tears’ is his own vivid account of that time.

    ‘Blood, Sweat and Tears- An Irish Soldier’s Story of Love and Loss’ is published by Liberties Press.

    'The Uninvited' by Liz Jensen, read by Enda Oates -2-6 September.  

    Liz Jensen’s novel opens with a seven-year-old girl putting a nail-gun to her grandmother's neck and firing. Shocking as this is, it soon becomes apparent that it’s not an isolated event and that there may be even be connections to the increasing number of cases of worldwide corporate sabotage, which anthropologist Hesketh Lock has been sent to investigate.

    ‘The Uninvited’ by Liz Jensen is published by Bloomsbury Circus.

    'The Forgotten Waltz' by Anne Enright, read by Cathy Belton - 26-30 August. 

    Set against the backdrop of the financial crash, Enright’s most recent novel focuses on the repercussions of an adulterous affair.

    ‘The Forgotten Waltz’ by Anne Enright is published by Vintage Books.

    Goodbye, My Brother by John Cheever, read by Gary Murphy- 19-23 August

    Goodbye, My Brother is one of the most acclaimed stories by the American writer, John Cheever. The short story was written shortly after World War Two, following the author’s discharge from the army. The fall-out from a family reunion forms the core of the tale.

    'The Buddha In The Attic’ by Julie Otsuka, read by Caitríona Ní Mhurchú - 12-16 August

    Julie Otsuka’s multi-award-winning novel tells the story of Japanese ‘picture brides’; thousands of young women brought by boat from Japan to settle in America almost a century ago.

    ‘The Buddha In The Attic’ by Julie Otsuka is published by Penguin.

    'J.G. Farrell: In His Own Words, read by Damian Kearney 5-9 August

    Damian Kearney reads a selection of the letters and diary extracts of the late writer J.G. Farrell.

    'J.G. Farrell: In His Own Words' is edited by Lavinia Greacen

    ‘A Week in Winter’ by Maeve Binchy, read by Kate Binchy 29 July-2 August

    To mark the first anniversary of the death of the much-loved writer Maeve Binchy, The Book on One this week features her final novel, ‘A Week in Winter’ which she finished just before her death in July 2012. ‘A Week in Winter’ is set in a small Irish town on the Atlantic Coast of Ireland. It tells the story of Geraldine Starr, known to everyone as Chicky, who leaves Stoneybridge as a young woman, only to return twenty years later to turn the rambling old Stone House into a hotel, a project which changes her life as well as the lives of those who come to visit.

     

    A Week in Winter is published by Orion Books.

    ‘A Week in Winter’ by Maeve Binchy, read by Kate Binchy
    29 July- 2 August
    To mark the first anniversary of the death of the much-loved writer Maeve Binchy, The Book on One this week features her final novel, ‘A Week in Winter’ which she finished just before her death in July 2012. ‘A Week in Winter’ is set in a small Irish town on the Atlantic Coast of Ireland. It tells the story of Geraldine Starr, known to everyone as Chicky, who leaves Stoneybridge as a young woman, only to return twenty years later to turn the rambling old Stone House into a hotel, a project which changes her life as well as those who come to visit.
    A Week in Winter is published by Orion Books.

    ‘Apparition & Late Fictions’ by Thomas Lynch, read by Gary Murphy – 17 to 21 June
    The first book of prose fiction from poet and essayist Thomas Lynch includes the novella ‘Apparition’, about a Methodist minister who finds success as a relationship guru following his divorce from his adulterous wife.
    ‘Apparition & Late Fictions’ is published by Jonathan Cape.
    ‘A Place Near Heaven’ by Damien Enright, read by the author – 10 to 14 June
    ‘A Place Near Heaven’ is the story of a calendar year in West Cork, told in month-by-month observations of the natural world.
    ‘A Place Near Heaven’ is published by Gill & MacMillan.
    ‘Paddle: A Long Way Around Ireland’ by Jasper Winn, read by the author – 3 to 7 June
    One summer, writer and musician Jasper Winn set himself the challenge of kayaking the whole way around Ireland - a journey of one thousand miles. But it turned out to be the worst Irish summer in living memory.
    ‘Paddle: A Long Way Around Ireland’ by Jasper Winn is published by Sort Of Books: www.sortof.co.uk

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    'Apparition and Late Fictions' by Thomas Lynch, read by Gary Murphy - 17 to 21 June

    The first book of prose fiction from poet and essayist Thomas Lynch includes the novella ‘Apparition’, about a Methodist minister who finds success as a relationship guru following his divorce from his adulterous wife.

    ‘Apparition & Late Fictions’ is published by Jonathan Cape.

    'A Place Near Heaven' by Damien Enright, read by the author - 10 to 14 June

    ‘A Place Near Heaven’ is the story of a calendar year in West Cork, told in month-by-month observations of the natural world.
    ‘A Place Near Heaven’ is published by Gill & MacMillan.

    'Paddle: A Long Way Around Ireland' by Jasper Winn, read by the author - 3 to 7 June

    One summer, writer and musician Jasper Winn set himself the challenge of kayaking the whole way around Ireland - a journey of one thousand miles. But it turned out to be the worst Irish summer in living memory.

    ‘Paddle: A Long Way Around Ireland’ by Jasper Winn is published by Sort Of Books: www.sortof.co.uk

    ‘Solace’ by Belinda McKeon, read by Aidan O’Hare – 27 to 31 May

    Belinda McKeon’s award-winning debut novel tells the story of Mark Casey, a doctoral student at Trinity College who is struggling with the demands of writing his thesis and helping out on the family farm at home in the midlands. His is a life without focus until he meets a young woman at a party.

    ‘Solace’ by Belinda McKeon is published by Picador.

    'Canada' by Richard Ford, read by the author - 20 to 24 May

    ‘First, I’ll tell about the robbery our parents committed. Then about the murders, which happened later.’

    So begins Richard Ford’s most recent novel ‘Canada’ which tells the story of 15-year-old Dell Parsons, and the impact that his parents’ actions have on the course of his life.

    ‘Canada’ by Richard Ford is published by Bloomsbury.

    So begins Richard Ford’s most recent novel ‘Canada’ which tells the story of 15-year-old Dell Parsons, and the impact that his parents’ actions have on the course of his life.‘Canada’ by Richard Ford is published by Bloomsbury.*Also currently available for playback:‘The Boat’ by Nam Le, read by Gary Murphy, 13 to 17 May'Dark Lies The Island' by Kevin Barry, read by the author, 6 to 10 May'The China Factory' by Mary Costello, read by Caitríona Ní Mhurchú, 29 April to 3 Mayand3 to 28 September 2012: 'Hard Times' by Charles Dickens, read by Conor Farrington.
    Click on 3 September in the Programme Archive.
    11 to 15 February 2013: 'Pride and Prejudice' by Jane Austen, read by Karen Ardiff.
    Click on 11 February in the Programme Archiv
    ‘The Boat’ by Nam Le, read by Gary Murphy - 13 to 17 May

    The book is the short story collection ‘The Boat’ by Nam Le.

    Over the course of the week, Gary Murphy reads the opening story - ‘Love and Honor and Pity and Pride and Compassion and Sacrifice’ – in which a Vietnamese-born Australian writer studying in America receives a visit from his father.
     
    'The Boat' by Nam Le is published by Canongate.

    ‘Dark Lies The Island’ by Kevin Barry, 6 to 10 May
    Kevin Barry reads from his latest short story collection ‘Dark Lies The Island’.
    Three stories will be read over the week:
    Monday: ‘Across The Rooftops’.
    Tuesday: ‘A Cruelty’.
    Wednesday to Friday: ‘Doctor Sot’.
    'Dark Lies The Island' by Kevin Barry is published by Jonathan Cape.
    ‘Dark Lies The Island’ by Kevin Barry, read by the author - 6 to 10 May

    Kevin Barry reads from his latest short story collection ‘Dark Lies The Island’.

    Three stories will be read over the week:
    Monday: ‘Across The Rooftops’.
    Tuesday: ‘A Cruelty’.
    Wednesday to Friday: ‘Doctor Sot’.

    'Dark Lies The Island' by Kevin Barry is published by Jonathan Cape.

     'The China Factory' by Mary Costello, read by Caitríona Ní Mhurchú - 29 April to 3 May

    From Monday to Wednesday, we'll hear 'The Sewing Room' in which a retired schoolteacher recalls the single event of her youth that changed her life forever.

    And on Thursday and Friday, in 'Things I See', a married woman is unsettled by a visit from her younger sister, a cellist.

    'The China Factory' by Mary Costello is published by The Stinging Fly Press.

    'Strumpet City’ by James Plunkett, read by Barry McGovern - 1 to 26 April

    To tie in with the ‘Dublin: One City, One Book’ initiative, for four weeks in April James Plunkett’s epic novel is The Book on One.

    ‘Strumpet City’ – which tells the story of the mass lockout of trade unionists by employers in Dublin in 1913 – features a wonderfully memorable cast of characters, not least of which is the city itself.

    A new edition of ‘Strumpet City’, which was first published in 1969, has been issued by Gill & Macmillan.

     'A Spring In My Step' by Joan McDonnell, read by Martina Carroll - 25 to 29 March

    To mark the 20th anniversary of the founding of the Post Polio Support Group, The Book on One features Joan McDonnell’s lively, humorous account of growing up with polio in the Limerick of the 1950s and 60s.

    'A Spring In My Step’ by Joan McDonnell is published by Collins Press.

    ‘Even The Dogs’ by Jon McGregor, read by Gary Murphy - 18 to 22 March

    ‘Even The Dogs’ - the winner of last year’s International Impac Dublin Literary Award – moves through the minds of a group of homeless heroin addicts in the wake of their friend’s death.

    Jon McGregor’s uncompromising novel – which pieces together one man’s story and the gradual disintegration of his world – is an intimate portrait of lives lived at the edge of society.

    ‘Even The Dogs’ by Jon McGregor is published by Bloomsbury.

    Scéalta le Seán Mac Mathúna - 11-15 Márta

    Is é an scríbhneoir Seán Mac Mathúna a bheidh linn ar an Book on One an tseachtain seo. Léifidh an túdar é fhéin dhá scéal dúinn, ‘Págánaigh’agus ‘Na Catacómaí’.

    Tá ‘Págánaigh’ foilsithe ag Cois Life sa leabhar ‘Banana’.

    Stories by Seán Mac Mathúna

    Writer Seán Mac Mathúna is our featured author on The Book on One this week. He will read two of his own short stories, ‘Págánaigh’ and ‘Na Catacómaí’.

    'Págánaigh' is published by Cois Life in 'Banana', a collection of short stories by Seán Mac Mathúna.

    'The Sisters Brothers' by Patrick deWitt, read by the author - 4 to 8 March

    Patrick deWitt’s offbeat Western follows Charlie and Eli Sisters, two professional hitmen making their way to California during the Gold Rush in 1851.

    DeWitt’s award-winning novel is a darkly comic tale, told from the point of view of the younger brother, Eli, who has become disillusioned with his life.

    'The Sisters Brothers' by Patrick deWitt is published by Granta.

    ‘The Best of Everything’ by Rona Jaffe, read by Megan Riordan - 25 February to 1 March

    Rona Jaffe’s debut novel, which caused a scandal when it was first published in 1958, follows the lives of four young women who move to New York looking for romance and hoping to build their careers.

    'The Best of Everything' by Rona Jaffe is published by Penguin.

    'A World of Love' by Elizabeth Bowen, read by Fiona Shaw - 18 to 22 February

    To mark the 40th anniversary of Elizabeth Bowen’s death, The Book on One features an archive recording of Fiona Shaw reading from Bowen’s 1955 novel ‘A World of Love’.

    The story centres on a group of relations staying in a run-down country house in Co Cork, and the repercussions following the discovery of a packet of love letters in the attic.

    The producer of the 1999 recording of 'A World of Love' was Séamus Hosey.

    'A World of Love' by Elizabeth Bowen is published by Vintage.

    'Pride and Prejudice’ by Jane Austen, read by Karen Ardiff - 11 to 15 February

    ‘It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife…’

    So begins one of Jane Austen’s best-loved novels, which celebrates its 200th birthday this year.

    Throughout Valentine’s week, listeners to The Book on One will be treated to the tale of the relationship between Austen’s feisty heroine Elizabeth Bennet and the aloof Mr Darcy.

    'The Buddha In The Attic’ by Julie Otsuka, read by Caitríona Ní Mhurchú - 4 to 8 February

    Julie Otsuka’s multi-award-winning novel tells the story of Japanese ‘picture brides’; thousands of young women brought by boat from Japan to settle in America almost a century ago.

    ‘The Buddha In The Attic’ by Julie Otsuka is published by Penguin.

    As there was no programme broadcast on Wednesday 6 February, a double episode of The Book on One aired the following night, and is available for playback.

    'The Forgotten Waltz' by Anne Enright, read by Cathy Belton - 28 January to 1 February

    Set against the backdrop of the financial crash, Enright’s most recent novel focuses on the repercussions of an adulterous affair.

    ‘The Forgotten Waltz’ by Anne Enright is published by Vintage Books.

    'The Bottle Factory Outing' by Beryl Bainbridge, read by Alison Glennie - 21 to 25 January

    Beryl Bainbridge’s 1974 novel centres on two very different women – shy Brenda and outspoken Freda – who work in an Italian-run wine-bottling factory and share a bedsit. When Freda decides to organise a work outing for all the factory employees, nothing will ever be the same again.

    ‘The Bottle Factory Outing’ by Beryl Bainbridge is published by Little, Brown.

    'Canada' by Richard Ford, read by the author - 14 to 18 January

    'First, I'll tell about the robbery our parents committed. Then about the murders, which happened later.'

    So begins Richard Ford's most recent novel 'Canada' which tells the story of 15-year-old Dell Parsons, and the impact that his parents' actions have on the course of his life.

    'Canada' by Richard Ford is published by Bloomsbury.

    'The Faster I Walk, The Smaller I Am' by Kjersti A. Skomsvold, read by Rosaleen Linehan - 7 to 11 January

    Mathea Martinsen is in her nineties and afraid her life will be over before anyone notices she has lived. And so she sets out to make her mark in the world.

    'The Faster I Walk, The Smaller I Am' by Kjersti A. Skomsvold, translated from the Norwegian by Kerri A. Pierce, is published by Dalkey Archive Press.

    'Happiness' by Mary Lavin - Tuesday 1 to Friday 4 January

    A very special series of The Book on One runs over four nights this week.

    On 7 October 1979, Mary Lavin and the American poet Elizabeth Bishop were scheduled to read together at the Sanders Theatre in Harvard University, at an event organised by Ploughshares Literary Magazine.

    When Elizabeth Bishop died unexpectedly the day before, the event became a tribute to her, during which Mary Lavin read her short story 'Happiness.'

    That reading of 'Happiness' has never been broadcast before now. It begins with Mary introducing the story to the audience, by describing how she came to write it.

    This recording is broadcast on The Book on One by special permission of the Lavin literary estate, and Ploughshares Literary Magazine.

    The 1979 event at Harvard was organised by the founders of Ploughshares - DeWitt Henry and Peter O'Malley. You can visit the journal's website at www.pshares.org

    'Happiness and Other Stories' by Mary Lavin is published by New Island.

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