The Book On One

    Monday to Friday, 11.10pm

    Book on One 2011 Archive

    Producer: Aidan Stanley

    Chronicles, Volume 1 by Bob Dylan: Monday 19th - Friday 23rd December 2011

    Bob Dylan's memoir, Chronicles , Volume One is read by Roger Gregg. Through Dylan's eyes we see Greenwich Village, circa 1961.

    The book is published by Simon and Schuster.

    Soldiers of Salamis by Javier Cercas - Part 2: Monday 12th - Friday 16th December

    Part Two of the renowned Spanish Civil War novel Soldiers of Salamis by Javier Cercas. The quietly-told, reflective story tells of a writer who is investigating a botched execution of a top Falangist figure. After following many false leads, the writer comes face to face with the failed executioner.

    Read by Gary Murphy.

    Soldiers of Salamis by Javier Cercas - Part 1: Monday 5th - Friday 9th December

    This week's readings are from Soldiers of Salamis, the best-selling novel by Javier Cercas, which takes a semi fictionalised look at the Spanish Civil War of 1936-1939 through the eyes of three people. These are a writer and Spanish Fascist Party member who later became a senior member of Franco's government. Also, the soldier who spared his life, and Cercas himself, as the journalist investigating this intriguing, touching story from that war. Translated from the Spanish by Ann McLean, and read by Gary Murphy.

    Unspoken by Gerard Stembridge: Monday 28th November - Friday 2nd December

    Gerard Stembridge reads from his novel, a portrait of Ireland in the 1960s when rapid change was about to engulf the nation. It charts the interlocking stories of a group of individuals. The presidential election loomed for Eamon de Valera and for a less elevated politician in Limerick it was time to sit up and be noticed. Meanwhile, in another part of that city, it was a dramatic time for coalman, Fonsie Strong.

    Read by Gary Murphy.

    Solace by Belinda McKeon: Monday 21st - Friday 25th November 2011

    Solace, the debut novel from Belinda McKeon, is read by Aidan O'Hare and Martina Carroll

    Mark, the son of a Midlands farmer working on his thesis at Trinity, becomes involved with Joanne, a girl from home training as a solicitor in Dublin.

    Goodbye, My Brother by John Cheever: Monday 14th - Friday 18th November 2011

    Goodbye, My Brother is one of the most acclaimed stories by the American writer, John Cheever. The short story was written shortly after World War Two, following the author’s discharge from the army. The fall-out from a family reunion forms the core of the tale. The reader is Gary Murphy.

    The Last Geraldine Officer by Thomas McCarthy: Monday 7th - Friday 11th November 2011

    The first part of Thomas McCarthy's book collects his short lyrics, while the second part recreates the Big House between the World Wars, specifically, the FitzGerald ( "Geraldine") family of Co Waterford which sends young men back to fight in British regiments, mainly the Irish Guards.

    Focusing on his Gaelic-speaking soldier-poet, Sir Gerald FitzGerald, and his manservant, Paax Foley, McCarthy evokes a time when men evaded the collective stance on Irish neutrality to fight against fascism. The narrative moves from ballad to prose poem, from mid-century Gaelic verse and even includes Waterford recipes.

    Read by Liam Heffernan, Damien Kearney and Martina Carroll. Published by Anvil.

    The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet by David Mitchell:

    Monday 31st October - Friday 4th November 2011 (Part Four)

    Week four of “The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet” by David Mitchell is read by Liam Heffernan, Gary Murphy, James Browne, Damian Kearney and Pascal Scott.

    Jacob has the support of the Japanese authorities in resisting the English plan to take Nagasaki, and in his desire to infuriate both Fischer and Captain Penhaligan, he has dubbed himself the President of the Provisional Republic of Dejima. The Captain has his own troubles, still grieving for Tristram, his dead son, and suffering also from a bad dose of gout. So, with the Dutch empire crumbling, Penhaligan is about to take advantage with a swift attack on the remaining Dutch community. Con Twomey’s old enemy, Major Cutlip, leads the attack.

    Monday 24th - Friday 28th October 2011 (Part Three)

    Week three of a four week broadcast of David Mitchell’s novel “The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet”. The book is set in Japan and it is read by Gary Murphy, Pascal Scott, James Browne and Liam Heffernan.

    HMS “Phoebus” lies anchored just offshore and is poised to attack Nagasaki in a British bid to replace the Dutch as trading partners with the Japanese. Meanwhile, Ogawa , the victim of a double-cross, has been captured by the evil Abbot Enomoto.

    Monday 17th - Friday 21st October 2011 (Part Two)

    The second of a four week broadcast of David Mitchell’s novel “The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet”. The book is set in Japan and it is read by Niall Toibin, Gary Murphy, Pascal Scott, Aideen Wylde, James Browne and Damian Kearney in the title role.
    Young Jacob is a clerk with the Dutch East Indies Company in the port of Nagasaki while back home in Holland his fiancé’s family are carefully watching his progress. In 1799, the nation of Japan is one that has shut out the world for a century and a half.
    It is against this background that Jacob arrives to help his master investigate widespread corruption and theft in Dejima. In addition, negotiations are underway concerning an important cargo of copper which the Dutch colonies require. Meanwhile Jacob has returned Orito’s fan to her and has illustrated it with a drawing of her face. Love is in the air.

    Monday 10th - Friday 14th October 2011 (Part One)

    Week one of four of The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet, written by David Mitchell and read by Niall Toibin, Gary Murphy, Damian Kearney, Pascal Scott, Aideen Wylde and Martina Carroll.

    Young Jacob is on his way to a posting with the Dutch East Indies in the port of Nagasaki while back home in Holland his fiancé’s family are carefully watching his progress. In 1799, the nation of Japan is one that has shut out the world for a century and a half. And in the port of Nagasaki, there’s an island called Dejima and it is this island that will be home to Jacob the clerk and his shipmates on “The Shenandoah”. The Dutch company’s previous vessel, “The Octavia”, was mysteriously sunk on its way to Japan with a loss of life and cargo.
    It is against this background that Jacob arrives to help his master investigate widespread corruption and theft in Dejima.

    On Canaan's Side by Sebastian Barry: Monday 3rd - Friday 7th October 2011

    Sebastian Barry’s latest novel, “On Canaan’s Side” is in the mix for this year’s Man Booker Prize and it is read for us by Áine Ní Mhuirí.

    89 year old Lily Bere is grieving for Bill, her grandson, who has just lost his life in the war in Afghanistan. She has begun to take stock of her own life, ranging back to her enforced flight from Ireland when Irish rebels had fought the forces of the Crown, she remembers her boyfriend Tadhg and the death threat he had received.
    70 years later she tries to come to terms with the loss of her grandson: a life lost for her adopted country.

    Your Voice In My Head by Emma Forrest: Monday 26th - Friday 30th September 2011

    "Your Voice in My Head" is a memoir written by the young English journalist and fiction writer, Emma Forrest.

    In her early twenties in 2000, when this memoir begins, and after years of suicidal thoughts, she had just started to see an eminent New York psychiatrist called Dr.R.

    For eight years he treats her. But his sudden death leaves her bereft. This memoir is her tribute to him and it is read now by Karen Cogan.

    Love Begins In Winter by Simon Van Booy: Monday 19th - Friday 23rd September 2011

    Love Begins in Winter" is the title story of a collection of short stories by Simon Van Booy and it is read for us by the author. Winner of the Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award in 2009, this is a tale about a chance meeting and the possibility of love.

    First broadcast 14th February 2011.

    Both Ways Is The Only Way I Want It by Maile Meloy: Monday 12th - Friday 16th September 2011

    This week’s book is a collection of short stories entitled “Both Ways Is The Only Way I Want It”, written by Maile Meloy.

    “O Tannenbaum” is the title of the first story, which will be read over Monday & Tuesday. A number of people have reached a fork in the road, caught between opposing forces – fidelity and desire.

    The reader is Sara Rose Wasson.

    The Cure by Conal Creedon: Monday 5th - Friday 9th September 2011

    The Cure began life as a trilogy of short Cork plays by Conal Creedon which premiered in 2005 during Cork's European City of Culture year. Later it travelled to Shanghai as a one-man show performed by Aidan O'Hare, who performs/reads it all this week. Following a three day bender, a man is waiting for a pub to open so he can purchase "the cure" of the title. As he ponders his fate, he notices a Christian Brother walking towards him on the street. How will he deal with this encounter, he asks himself? We travel back to his childhood spent in a Cork city redolent with the smell of slaughter-houses, pubs and sweet-makers.

    Read by Aidan O'Hare. Published by Irish Town Press.

    Fox, Swallow, Scarecrow by Eílis Ni Dhuibhne: Monday 29th August - Friday 2nd September 2011

    This week’s book is a novel called Fox, Swallow, Scarecrow, which is described as a Celtic Tiger novel about contemporary Ireland’s chattering intelligentsia. Anna Kelly Sweeney is one of the two protagonists in the story. She is a writer of popular fiction, intent on worldly success. Her historical novels for young people have not done too badly but, influenced by the Harry Potter phenomenon, she has decided that a change of tack is now necessary. The book is read by Emma Lowe. Published by Blackstaff Press.

    Room by Emma Donoghue

    Monday 22nd - Friday 26th August 2011 (Part Two)

    The second week of excerpts from “Room” by Emma Donoghue. This novel, which was shortlisted for last year’s Man Booker Prize, is about a little boy named Jack and his mother. Jack has never been outside the room in which he lives.

    The reader is Hilary O’Shaughnessy. First broadcast 18th Oct 2010.

    Monday 15th - Friday 19th August 2011 (Part One)

    Over the next two weeks we will bring you excerpts from “Room” by Emma Donoghue. This novel, which was shortlisted for last year’s Man Booker Prize, is about a little boy named Jack and his mother. Jack has never been outside the room in which he lives.

    The reader is Hilary O’Shaughnessy. First broadcast 18th Oct 2010.

    J.G. Farrell: In His Own Words edited by Lavinia Greacen: Monday 8th - Friday 12th August 2011

    These letters and diary extracts, selected by Lavinia Greacen, are at times funny, teasing, anxious and ambitious. As a correspondent he was both direct and diverting.
    Jim Farrell, as his friends knew him, was born in Liverpool in 1935 and when his parents moved to Ireland in his youth, he spent a considerable amount of time in this country.
    He wrote majestic novels such as “Troubles” and “The Siege of Krishnapur”, but this book allows a glimpse of the man himself. His tragic death in 1979 robbed the world of a major writer.

    Read by Damian Kearney.

    You by Nuala Ní Chonchúir: Monday 1st - Friday 5th August 2011

    Nuala Ní Chonchúir's debut novel tells of a 10 year old girl who lives with her separated mother and two brothers. Set against the backdrop of the River Liffey in 1980, the story unfolds through the narrator's observations and interactions, and her naive interpretations of adult conversations and behaviour.

    Read by Martina Carroll.

    Foster by Claire Keegan: Monday 25th - Friday 29th July 2011

    Written and read by its author, Claire Keegan, Foster was the winner of the Davy Byrne Memorial Prize, and, after its initial origins as a short story was subsequently published in a revised and expanded version.

    Published by Faber & Faber in 2010

    The Grass Arena by John Healy: Monday 18th - Friday 22nd July 2011

    Born in London to poor Irish parents 70 years ago, John Healy was hardened on the streets by the age of seven……. and was out of school by fourteen.
    Casting himself as neither hero nor victim, he recalls the downward spiral of his teenage years, overwhelmed by alcoholism and isolated on the edge of society.
    He ends up in the grass arena – the terrifying world ruled by psychopaths and peopled by beggars, con-men, thieves, prostitutes and killers.

    Read by the Author.

    Paddle: A Long Way Around Ireland: Monday 11th - Friday 15th July 2011

    This week’s book is called “Paddle” and it’s written and read by Jasper Winn. The background is as follows; one Irish summer, writer and musician Jasper Winn comes up with an extraordinary plan. He will kayak all the way around Ireland- bay by bay, paddling clockwise until he finds himself back where he started. But this is the worst Irish summer in living memory.

    Published by Sort of Books www.sortof.co.uk

    Song For A Poor Boy by Patrick Galvin: Monday 30th May - Friday 3rd June

    The late Patrick Galvin's memoirs, The Raggy Boy Trilogy, are published in one volume by New Island Press and comprise Song for a Poor Boy, which recounts the author's life and family background in an impoverished 1930s Cork, Song for a Raggy Boy and the third volume Song for a Flyboy, set during World War Two, when Galvin served with the RAF Bomber Command and was posted to Sierra Leone, Western Sahara and Palestine.

    Song for a Poor Boy is read by Paschal Scott.

    The Bob Dylan Encyclopedia Greatest Hits: Monday 23rd - Friday 27th May 2011

    As the folk music legend Bob Dylan celebrates his 70th birthday this week, the programme will take a look at his career, with a particular focus on the music tracks which have brought him legendary status. Michael Gray reads his book “The Bob Dylan Encyclopedia Greatest Hits”.

    Book published by Continuum International and audio book published by look at me dance ltd.

    Balcony of Europe by Aidan Higgins: Monday 16th - Friday 20th May 2011

    Gary Murphy reads Aidan Higgins novel “Balcony of Europe”. It’s 1962 and we are in Spain, at the seaside town of Nerja, where the Ruttles, Dan and Olivia, are spending a year or two.
    Nerja has the makings of an artistic colony, and Dan, an Irish artist, has fallen for a woman half his age.

    The Holy Land by Maurice Riordan: Monday 9th - Friday 13th May 2011

    “The Holy Land”, written and read by Maurice Riordan, has its setting in rural Cork in the 1950s in which the subdued microcosm of farm life is quietly brought to life.
    In these stories and poems, we hear the voices of the writer’s father, his neighbours and assorted farmhands.

    1st broadcast 30th August 2010

    A Rich Soup by Brian Farrington: Monday 2nd - Friday 6th May 2011

    Elder brother of Conor Farrington, the actor, playwright and broadcaster Brian was born in Dublin in 1925. Most of his life has been spent as an ex-pat Irishman in France and Scotland, with time spent in Manchester and Hungary. His memoir, A Rich Soup (Linden Press) recounts "a long and on the whole enjoyable life spent exploiting an awkwardly heterogeneous set of talents and fitting them into a teacher's career".

    The young Farrington scales the Pyrenees, delves deep into Irish caverns, and explores life in a "left wing commune in Paris". A pioneer in the use of computers for language learning, Brian once ran Aberdeen University's language centre. He has published two collections of poetry and a short book on WB Yeats. He has also designed and programmed several innovative software packages. He briefly crossed paths with Simone de Beauvoir, Brendan Behan, Brian Boydell, Noam Chomsky and Georges Pompidou.

    The book is read by the Author.

    The Love of Sisters by Eugene McCabe:

    Monday 25th - Friday 29th April 2011 (Part Two)

    This week we bring you the second week of a two-week broadcast of a novel from the pen of one of Ireland’s best playwrights. The book is called “The Love of Sisters” and it is written by Eugene McCabe. The reader is Ruth McCabe, a celebrated actor in her own right and the daughter of the author.

    Monday 18th - Friday 22nd April 2011 (Part One)

    This week we bring you the first week of a two-week broadcast of a novel from the pen of one of Ireland’s best playwrights. The book is called “The Love of Sisters” and it is written by Eugene McCabe. The reader is Ruth McCabe, a celebrated actor in her own right and the daughter of the author.

    First broadcast 28th June 2010

    Ghost Light by Joseph O'Connor: Monday 11th - Friday 15th April 2011

    Joseph O’Connor’s reads from his latest novel “Ghost Light”.

    The book begins with an account of an affair in Dublin in the year 1907 between an actress, still in her teens, and a damaged older man, the leading playwright at the theatre where she works. Many years later, an old woman makes her way across London on a morning after it has been struck by a hurricane.

    1st broadcast 21st June 2010.

    The Bottle Factory Outing by Beryl Bainbridge: Monday 4th - Friday 8th April 2011

    Beryl Bainbridge, the author of seventeen novels, two travel books and five plays for stage and television, died last July. She had several novels nominated for the Man Booker Prize but never won. This is something the organisers of the Award will compensate for later this month.

    Her dark comedy “The Bottle Factory Outing” is read for us by Alison Glennie.

    Where The God of Love Hangs Out by Amy Bloom:

    Monday 28th March - Friday 1st April 2011 (Week Two)

    Monday 21st - Friday 25th March 2011 (Week One)

    Karen Cogan reads from Amy Bloom's short story collection.

    “Where the God of Love Hangs Out”, published by Granta, includes the bitter-sweet tale of Clare and William. Married to others, these two find themselves irresistibly drawn to each other.

    An Béal Bocht by Myles na gCopaleen: Monday 14th - Friday 18th March 2011

    The Book on One for Seachtain na Gaeilge is Flann O'Brien's classic satire as Gaeilge An Beal Bocht, which is read by Tomás Ó Canainn.

    The Country Girls by Edna O'Brien: Monday 7th - Friday 11th March 2011

    In 1960 Edna O’Brien’s debut novel “The Country Girls” was first published. This week we remind listeners of the success and the controversy which surrounded the book, with a reading of what is now a classic, by Hilary O’Shaughnessy. The book is set in rural Ireland and in a country village Caithleen Brady and her friend Baba are on the verge of womanhood.

    First broadcast 22nd March 2010.

    My Better Half and Me by Rosemary and Joss Ackland:

    Monday 28th February - Friday 4th March 2011

    English actor Joss Ackland reads from My Better Half and Me, the edited diaries of his wife of 51 years, Rosemary Ackland. Rosemary was diagnosed with motor neurone disease in 2000 and died in 2002. Throughout her life she kept a diary of their marriage and relationship, documenting the loss of their eldest son, Paul, to heroin, the burning down of their family home in the '60s, their love life and other intimate details of their lives together. In the years since her death, Ackland has read and edited the diaries for publication by Ebury Press.

    Alison Glennie reads alongside Joss Ackland. First broadcast 10th May 2010.

    Your Voice In My Head by Emma Forrest: Monday 21st - Friday 25th February 2011

    Emma Forrest was settled in Manhattan at 22 and on contract to The Guardian when she realised that her quirkiness had gone beyond eccentricity. Happily, she eventually found a decidedly optimistic psychiatrist, whose wisdom and humanity would turn her life around.

    Your Voice in My Head, Emma Forrest's riveting account of that time in her life, is read by Karen Cogan.

    Love Begins In Winter by Simon Van Booy: Monday 14th - Friday 18th February 2011

    "Love Begins in Winter" is the title story of a collection of short stories by Simon Van Booy and it is read for us by the author. Winner of the Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award in 2009, this is a tale about a chance meeting and the possibility of love.

    Simon Van Booy was born in London, grew up in Wales and Oxford and has lived in Paris, Athens and New York. While the locations are wide-ranging and the characters have diverse backgrounds, his creations tend to share an uncommon degree of sadness, and are often on the verge of giving up.

    Sleepwalker by John Toomey: Monday 7th - Friday 11th February 2011

    Sleepwalker, by 35-year-old Dublin author John Toomey, is a contemporary novel set in "summertime Dublin". The story follows Stuart, a young, handsome and single executive, who is suddenly struck down by a nauseous lethargy. The narrative follows him through a tumultuous week of excess, promiscuity, deception, cowardice and self-examination against the backdrop of the Tiger economy "and the transformed self-esteem of the young Irish".

    Read by Damian Kearney.

    The Book On One on Twitter

    Producer: Aoife Nic Cormaic

    Schedule Open Schedule