THE SECRET MILLIONAIRE ***New Series***

 Margaret Farrelly helping out in the St Nicholas of Myra community centre Image Name: Margaret Farrelly helping out in the St Nicholas of Myra community centre
Margaret Farrelly, Episode One Secret Millionaire Image Name: Margaret Farrelly, Episode One Secret Millionaire

Secret Millionaire returns for a third series this September and once again three very different Irish millionaires turn their back on their day-to-day lives and go undercover in search of genuine people in need of their help. Their search for local Irish charities brings them face-to-face with some of our most pressing social problems including, cancer in young children, youth violence, disability and addiction.  Again they visit various parts of Ireland in search of those unsung heroes not often seen in the media.

On their journey the three secret millionaires Margaret Farrelly, Warren Logan and Enda O Coineen meet extraordinary Irish people working selflessly everyday to help people in their own communities. Each millionaire then springs the ultimate surprise when they give thousands of euro of their own money to their chose charities and reveal themselves as a Secret Millionaire.

This series the millionaires are not tied to particular communities but head further afield looking for those people who are most in need and also this year more money is given away by the millionaires this year than in both the previous series.

Episode one sees Margaret Farrelly of Clonarn Clover, Ireland’s largest independent supplier, of free range eggs, travel to Dublin in search of people and groups that she might be able to help.

Margaret Farrelly is a very engaging and warm person but also has a determined edge to her, which has helped her build her business, raise a family and cope with a busy life generally.

Margaret’s youngest sister died of cancer at the age of 18. This had a profound effect on her as the eldest daughter and emerges in the programme as a source of sadness in her life as she is forced to face that grief when she spends time with a grass roots cancer charity that is doing its best to help others.

The other charities she encounters include Ireland’s only disabled choir, a community centre in the Liberties under huge pressure and a men’s group helping fathers cope with children who are drug addicts – all far from Margaret’s comfort zone.