“Duncan Stewart – Return to Chernobyl”

Duncan Stewart transfered by ambulance to Gomel following his near fatal accident. Image Name: Duncan Stewart transfered by ambulance to Gomel following his near fatal accident. Description: Duncan Stewart - Return to Chernobyl Copyright: © (source).  This image may be reproduced in print or electronic format forpromotional purposes only.
Duncan Stewart following his near fatal accident in Belarus in 2003 Image Name: Duncan Stewart following his near fatal accident in Belarus in 2003 Description: Duncan Stewart - Return to Chernobyl Copyright: © (source).  This image may be reproduced in print or electronic format forpromotional purposes only.
Duncan Stewart with Adi Roche Image Name: Duncan Stewart with Adi Roche Description: Duncan Stewart - Return to Chernobyl Copyright: © (source).  This image may be reproduced in print or electronic format forpromotional purposes only.
Duncan Stewart and Adi Roche in Chernobyl Image Name: Duncan Stewart and Adi Roche in Chernobyl Description: Duncan Stewart - Return to Chernobyl Copyright: © (source).  This image may be reproduced in print or electronic format forpromotional purposes only.

 


 Two years after his near fatal accident, we join architect, environmentalist and TV presenter Duncan Stewart on his journey back to the contaminated region of Chernobyl and Belarus to complete his original fact finding mission.


 In 2003 Duncan was prevented from completing a journey to Chernobyl due to an accident.  Travelling with the Chernobyl Children’s Project his aim was to inspect the progress on a number of building projects including an orphanage and day care centre being built in Belarus. 


He was also to discuss with Adi Roche future Chernobyl Children’s projects and to try and discover the current state of the sarcophagus at the world’s most infamous nuclear reactor.  However, in an attempt to get a better camera angle Duncan climbed a tree weakened by radiation – the branch snapped under his weight and Duncan suffered a near fatal fall.  


 Duncan tells the story of his interest and involvement with Chernobyl, and the circumstance surrounding the accident that nearly killed him.  Duncan’s return visit was a poignant opportunity for him to re-visit the scene of his accident; explain what happened on that fateful day; and in the critical period following the accident to detail how he was helped by colleagues and locals to recover and return home.  


 The documentary uncovers how this experience changed his life and how he has changed as a person. Against this backdrop he speaks to families who once lived in the shadows of this reactor and how the accident and subsequent fallout has impacted on their lives and will for generations to come. Duncan also tries to complete his unfinished business by finding out what is the state of the sarcophagus in Chernobyl?  What potential disaster still lies dormant beneath?  And what lessons need to be foremost in any future Global Nuclear debate?


 We learn how his own accident has focused his desire to try and get to the truth about the Chernobyl legacy and what messages it holds for our future. Duncan talks to scientists, politicians and aid workers who have spent the last 20 years coming to terms with the consequences of the disaster and through these encounters shows the realities of the present situation and evaluate the solutions for the future.


By also interviewing the individuals he meets on his journey back to Chernobyl this documentary will also reveal what living in the shadow of the tragedy has done do their lives and discover what has changed as the 20th anniversary of the disaster approaches (26th April 2006).