Landmark Dublin view to open to the public

Thursday 13 February 2014 22.06
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Nobody has been to the top of the 51 metre-high tower since its staircase was destroyed in 1971
Nobody has been to the top of the 51 metre-high tower since its staircase was destroyed in 1971
Visitors to Glasnevin Cemetery will soon be able to climb to the top of the O'Connell Tower
Visitors to Glasnevin Cemetery will soon be able to climb to the top of the O'Connell Tower
The attack on the tower was attributed to loyalist paramilitaries
The attack on the tower was attributed to loyalist paramilitaries
Construction on a new internal stairway is due to begin later this month
Construction on a new internal stairway is due to begin later this month

Visitors to Glasnevin Cemetery in Dublin will soon be able to climb to the top of the iconic O'Connell Tower for the first time in over 40 years.

Nobody has been to the top of the 51 metre-high tower, which stands over the tomb of the Irish patriot and politician Daniel O'Connell, since its winding staircase was destroyed by a bomb in 1971.

The attack was attributed to loyalist paramilitaries and was seen as a response to the 1966 destruction of Nelson's Pillar in O'Connell Street.

A €200,000 restoration project has been announced by the Glasnevin Trust and the Office of Public Works.

Construction on a new internal stairway is due to begin later this month, with the project due for completion by October.