Exhibition highlights working lives from 1893-1913

Thursday 24 October 2013 21.51
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Dunville & Co Belfast Pot Still (Picture: National Photographic Archive)
Dunville & Co Belfast Pot Still (Picture: National Photographic Archive)
Tie making at Atkinson's Poplin Factory (Picture: NPA)
Tie making at Atkinson's Poplin Factory (Picture: NPA)
Cleeve Brothers, Limerick (Picture: NPA)
Cleeve Brothers, Limerick (Picture: NPA)
Smith & Co Trimming Shop (Picture: NPA)
Smith & Co Trimming Shop (Picture: NPA)
Goodbody's Tobacco (Picture: NPA)
Goodbody's Tobacco (Picture: NPA)
The Oceanic (Picture: NPA)
The Oceanic (Picture: NPA)
Industrial school, Baltimore (Picture: NPA)
Industrial school, Baltimore (Picture: NPA)
Roughing flax (Picture: NPA)
Roughing flax (Picture: NPA)
Winstanley's Bootmakers (Picture: NPA)
Winstanley's Bootmakers (Picture: NPA)

A new exhibition of rarely seen photographs sheds new light on the lives of Irish workers at the end of the 19th and into the 20th Century.

Working Lives, 1893-1913, at the National Photographic Archive in Templebar, Dublin, features 148 contemporary photographs of workers throughout the island of Ireland from 1893 to 1913.

The images come from the Poole Collection (1884-1954), comprising 66,000 photographic glass negatives, and the Mason Collection (1890-1910), comprising 2,000 glass lantern slides.

Many of the lantern slides produced by Mason, a Dublin firm, illustrated Royal Commission or parliamentary reports.

The glass plate negatives produced by the Waterford-based Poole firm illustrated the lives and events of people in the southeast of Ireland.

The exhibition highlights working conditions across Ireland for men, for women and for children, in both public and private spheres, during a period of profound transformation in the Irish workplace culminating in 1913 with the Dublin Lockout.

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