Moy Park in Brazil as World Cup sponsor

Monday 09 June 2014 13.37
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World Cup kicks off in Brazil on Thursday
World Cup kicks off in Brazil on Thursday
Moy Park's Director of Brand marketing, Andrew Nethercott, says company wants to grow globally
Moy Park's Director of Brand marketing, Andrew Nethercott, says company wants to grow globally
Companies target the World Cup to advertise their products and attempt to broaden their customer base
Companies target the World Cup to advertise their products and attempt to broaden their customer base

Football's World Cup is the most watched and most popular sporting event on the planet. Not surprisingly, it attracts some of the world's biggest companies as its sponsors, writes Glenn Mason.

The competition on the road to Brazil was just as fierce off the pitch as it was on it, as businesses invested heavily to get the exclusivity that goes with the tournament.

This year's tournament begins in Sao Paulo on Thursday as hosts Brazil play Croatia. The evening kick-off of 9pm (Irish time) will be a common feature, as many games will take place during prime time viewing hours in Europe.

FIFA research shows that even non-sport fans tune in to watch World Cup games, all the more reason why companies target it to advertise their products and attempt to broaden their customer base.

The game's governing body set up a three-tier sponsorship strategy for the 2010 and 2014 World Cups, with six partners, eight sponsors, as well as a group of national supporters.

The chosen few partners and sponsors are household names with massive workforces across the world.

One such name that will be familiar to many Irish consumers will be poultry firm Moy Park, which is based in Craigavon, Co Armagh.

The company, which has a significant presence on both sides of the border, employs about 12,000 people across Europe.

It owes its presence at the World Cup to its parent company Marfrig, as Moy Park Director of Brand marketing Andrew Nethercott explains.

"The Moy Park business is part of an overall global business that is owned by Marfrig," he said.

"Marfrig are based in Brazil and the parent company has been involved with the last two World Cups in South Africa and now in Brazil. Our parent company is based in Brazil, the World Cup is in Brazil and it is a natural link."

As well as the competition to secure sponsorship, there was also inter-company rivalry to get on the advertising boards around the pitch at the 12 venues.

Moy Park is no different as it beat off its inter-company rivals to get the much-coveted slot. It aims to develop the brand outside of Europe and hopes the World Cup will enable it to do so.

"We're leading with the Moy Park brand, which is a great opportunity," stated Mr Nethercott.

"We've been supporting the Moy Park brand here in Ireland for a number of years and we were able to demonstrate to our colleagues in Brazil that it was a great opportunity to use the World Cup to expand Moy Park beyond the island of Ireland," he said.

"We have ambitions to grow the Moy Park brand globally. We see this as the biggest sporting event in the world. We will see Moy Park around the pitchside. People will get a great opportunity to see our brand and get brand awareness, and that gives us a great platform to deliver on some of our ambitions to grow the brand across Europe," he added.

As part of the sponsorship process, companies are obliged to supply products, whether that's poultry, courtesy cars or alcoholic drinks.

Does this mean that the likes of Messi, Ronaldo and Neymar will eat Moy Park products for their pre-match meals.

"Hopefully the players when they are out in Brazil will be consuming some of the Marfrig products, whether that's pork, chicken or beef," Mr Nethercott responded.

"When those players come back into Europe they'll be looking to chicken and poultry and hopefully consuming Moy Park products when they get back to their club teams."

Sponsorship is a key part of Moy Park's business and it has a long association with the Irish Open golf tournament and the European Tour, which Mr Nethercott said the company is "very proud" about.

He said it tries to give a lot back to the local community as part of corporate social responsibility, with several sporting organisations benefiting.

"We see sponsorship as being a very important part of the overall brand awareness mix so we are involved with the European Tour and the Irish Open," he said.

"We have supported that for the last couple of years and we also get very heavily involved and actively involved in local communities. We support rugby and things like soccer.

"We are also involved as an official sponsor of Tyrone GAA for example. We get involved on a local basis and that is part of our corporate social responsibility giving back to the community."

It may cost a lot to associate with FIFA tournaments, but Moy Park feels it is a price worth paying and a risk-free investment.

It owes its presence at the World Cup to its parent company Marfrig, as Moy Park Director of Brand marketing Andrew Nethercott explains.

"The Moy Park business is part of an overall global business that is owned by Marfrig," he said.

"Marfrig are based in Brazil and the parent company has been involved with the last two World Cups in South Africa and now in Brazil. Our parent company is based in Brazil, the World Cup is in Brazil and it is a natural link."

As well as the competition to secure sponsorship, there was also inter-company rivalry to get on the advertising boards around the pitch at the 12 venues.

Moy Park is no different as it beat off its inter-company rivals to get the much-coveted slot. It aims to develop the brand outside of Europe and hopes the World Cup will enable it to do so.

"We're leading with the Moy Park brand, which is a great opportunity," stated Mr Nethercott.

"We've been supporting the Moy Park brand here in Ireland for a number of years and we were able to demonstrate to our colleagues in Brazil that it was a great opportunity to use the World Cup to expand Moy Park beyond the island of Ireland," he said.

"We have ambitions to grow the Moy Park brand globally. We see this as the biggest sporting event in the world. We will see Moy Park around the pitchside. People will get a great opportunity to see our brand and get brand awareness, and that gives us a great platform to deliver on some of our ambitions to grow the brand across Europe," he added.

As part of the sponsorship process, companies are obliged to supply products, whether that's poultry, courtesy cars or alcoholic drinks.

Does this mean that the likes of Messi, Ronaldo and Neymar will eat Moy Park products for their pre-match meals?

"Hopefully the players when they are out in Brazil will be consuming some of the Marfrig products, whether that's pork, chicken or beef," Mr Nethercott responded.

"When those players come back into Europe they'll be looking to chicken and poultry and hopefully consuming Moy Park products when they get back to their club teams."

Sponsorship is a key part of Moy Park's business and it has a long association with the Irish Open golf tournament and the European Tour, which Mr Nethercott said the company is "very proud" about.

He said it tries to give a lot back to the local community as part of corporate social responsibility, with several sporting organisations benefiting.

"We see sponsorship as being a very important part of the overall brand awareness mix so we are involved with the European Tour and the Irish Open," he said.

"We have supported that for the last couple of years and we also get very heavily involved and actively involved in local communities. We support rugby and things like soccer.

"We are also involved as an official sponsor of Tyrone GAA for example. We get involved on a local basis and that is part of our corporate social responsibility giving back to the community."

It may cost a lot to associate with FIFA tournaments, but Moy Park feels it is a price worth paying and a risk-free investment.