Numbers on the Live Register fell again in November

Wednesday 04 December 2013 13.09
The CSO says the standardised unemployment rate eased to 12.5% in November from 12.6% in October
The CSO says the standardised unemployment rate eased to 12.5% in November from 12.6% in October

New figures from the Central Statistics Office show that the numbers signing on the Live Register fell by 3,400 in November, on a seasonally adjusted basis.

A total of 406,200 people were on the Live Register in November - the lowest total since June 2009. November also marked the 17th monthly decrease in a row.

The CSO said that in unadjusted terms, a total of 391,507 people were on the Live Register last month, down 6.2% on the same time last year.

The standardised unemployment rate eased to 12.5% in November from 12.6% in October. This is the lowest level since July 2009 and compares to an unemployment rate of 14.1% in November of last year. 

Today's figures show that the number of male claimants on the Live Register fell by 8.6% to 243,538 over the year, while female claimants eased by 1.9% to 147,969. 

The number of long term claimants in November stood at 179,758, with the number of men in that category down by 6.2% in the year to November, while the number of long term claimants who are women rose by 2.5%. 

In the year to November, the number of people aged 25 and over on the Live Register fell by 5.2% and the number of people aged under 25 decreased by 11.1%. The percentage of under 25s on the Live Register now stands at 15.3%, down from 16.1% the same month last year and 17.6% in November 2011.

Commenting on today's CSO figures, Merrion economist Alan McQuaid said that while emigration has clearly been a factor in bringing the unemployment figures down, there are encouraging signs on the labour market front. 

"The most recent Quarterly National Household Survey showed a year-on-year net increase of 58,000 in employment in the third quarter of 2013 after gains of 33,800 and 20,500 in the second and first quarters respectively. Furthermore, the bulk of the annual increase in the July-September period was in full-time rather than part-time jobs," he said.