Consumers more inquisitve after horsemeat scandal

Tuesday 09 April 2013 11.36
Consumers are asking more questions about provenance and traceability of food
Consumers are asking more questions about provenance and traceability of food

Consumers are seeking more information about food producers and traceability in light of the horsemeat scandal, a new report on the food industry has found.

Customers are gravitating towards local businesses they can trust, according to the report from Good Food Ireland and Grant Thornton.

It highlights the effect the horsemeat scandal has had on the food industry in Ireland, how labelling deception is widespread across Europe, and how Good Food Ireland businesses expect to grow profitability in 2013.

The survey shows that 97% of Good Food Ireland businesses expect higher turnover in 2013, with the horsemeat scandal to play a significant role in driving this growth.

"The survey also shows strong support for regulation that places renewed emphasis on traceability and provenance. Labelling of foodstuffs is an EU wide problem. One positive that has emerged from the horsemeat scandal is that the food labelling issue has been pushed to the top of EU policymaker's agenda," Ciara Jackson, Head of Food at Grant Thornton said.

Seven out of ten businesses surveyed welcome regulation that places renewed emphasis on food sustainability such as traceability and provenance.

Almost all feel that local Irish food is an integral economic driver for their business.