Jury in Finnegan murder trial sent home

Thursday 03 July 2014 20.57
Anna Finnegan had been in a relationship with Vesel Jahiri for ten years
Anna Finnegan had been in a relationship with Vesel Jahiri for ten years

The jury in the trial of a 33-year-old man accused of murdering his ex-partner has been sent home for a second night and will resume deliberating on a verdict tomorrow.

Vesel Jahiri from Louth Village, Dundalk denies murdering 25-year-old Anna Finnegan at Allendale Glen, Clonsilla in Dublin on 21 September 2012.

Mr Jahiri has also pleaded not guilty to assault causing harm on Ms Finnegan's brother, Karl, on the same date.

The trial at the Central Criminal Court heard how Ms Finnegan and Mr Jahiri had been in a ten-year relationship which had "deteriorated dramatically" amid a dispute over access to their two young children.

It is alleged that on 21 September 2012 Mr Jahiri forced his way into her home through the front door.

There was an altercation with her brother Karl who was stabbed in the chest and head.

Ms Finnegan fled in distress but collapsed on the roadside, she had received a single stab wound.

Mr Jahiri took her to hospital and dropped her at the entrance to the emergency department.

He later presented himself to gardaí but he denied stabbing Ms Finnegan.

He said Karl Finnegan had two knives and he had grabbed one of them to use on Mr Finnegan in self defence.

Mr Finnegan said Mr Jahiri had arrived at the house with a knife and attacked him before chasing after his sister.

In closing arguments, the prosecution said the physical evidence of his frame of mind on the day was "utterly overwhelming" because he had smashed his way through a front door.

Prosecuting Counsel Patrick Marrinan said this was compelling evidence on which he could be convicted of murder.

However, the defence said the medical evidence suggested the jury could not exclude the possibility that Ms Finnegan was stabbed when she got between two people fighting with knives.

Senior Counsel Brendan Grehan said the jury should first consider the manner in which she may have received the single stab wound.

"It only becomes murder if the person intended to kill or cause serious injury," he said.

The trial has continued for the past number of days in Mr Jahiri's absence.

The jury was told this should not affect its deliberations and they should not draw any inference from his absence.