Nigeria wraps up kidnap probe despite 200 girls still missing

Friday 20 June 2014 22.10
Submitting the final report, Brigadier General Ibrahim Sabo said 219 girls remained at large
Submitting the final report, Brigadier General Ibrahim Sabo said 219 girls remained at large

Nigeria has wrapped up its inquiry into the abduction of more than 200 schoolgirls by militants.

Very few have been freed after the initial kidnapping that some girls escaped from last April.

The kidnapping of the teenage girls taking exams in Chibok village sparked global outrage for its sheer barbarity.
              
The government's failure to rescue the girls, or protect them before their abduction, has become a political liability for President Goodluck Jonathan ahead of elections next year.

Submitting the final report, Brigadier General Ibrahim Sabo said 219 girls remained at large.

A total virtually unchanged since Boko Haram militants stormed their secondary school in northeast Borno state on 14 April to kidnap them.
              
A total of 57 girls, almost all of whom escaped shortly after the abduction, have been reunited with their families.. 

"We are ... pained that the schoolgirls remain in captivity," Sabo said in a statement. "The hostage situation that this represents is obviously delicate."
              
The Chibok kidnapping and other increasingly bloody attacks by Boko Haram have underscored Abuja's inability to stamp out the militant group, which aims to carve out a radical Islamist state in the mostly Muslim north.
              
In what could raise the ire of Jonathan's critics, Mr Sabo recommended the findings of the fact-finding group appointed by the president remain confidential for national security reasons.     

Mr Sabo also seemed to try to deflect expected criticism fromthe government.              

"For the Chibok schoolgirls, little will be achieved through finger-pointing," he said in his statement.
              
"Getting the girls out, and safely, too, is by far more important than the publicity generated by the blame game that has tended to becloud the issue."
              
The attack shocked Nigerians, even as they have grown used to hearing about atrocities in an increasingly bloody five-year-old Islamist insurgency in the north.
              
From being a religious movement opposed to Western culture -Boko Haram means "Western education is a sin" in the northern Hausa language - the sect has emerged as a well-armed insurrection with a growing thirst for blood.    

Boko Haram kill 10 in northeast         

Meanwhile, Suspected Boko Haram gunmen have killed 10 people in raids on five villages in Nigeria's northeast Adamawa state.

Scores of gunmen dressed in military uniform stormed the villages of Imirsa, Shuwari, Yaza, Humabza and Anguwar Shuwa, burning homes and looting food supplies.

The attackers invaded these villages and destroyed everything in them after carting away food stuffs belonging to the villagers. 

About 15,000 people who fled their homes from the villages are now taking refuge in Gulak, the headquarters of the local government.