Coroner calls for review of Beacon Hospital's laboratory policy

Wednesday 12 March 2014 11.00
Maurice Cleary was being treated for cancer when he picked up the infection
Maurice Cleary was being treated for cancer when he picked up the infection

The Dublin City Coroner has called for a review of the weekend laboratory policy at the Beacon Hospital in Dublin.

Dr Brian Farrell told the inquest into the death of Maurice Cleary that he would be writing to the board of the hospital.

Mr Cleary, 55, from Kilmacud in Dublin, was being treated for cancer when he picked up the healthcare-associated infection MSSA (Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus) in March 2012.

As part of the treatment he was receiving, Mr Cleary had drugs administered to him via a tube into his chest. 

The inquest into his death had previously heard how Mr Cleary had attended the hospital on 9 March 2012. 

He had been tested for MRSA and those tests proved negative. 

He was admitted to hospital on Monday 12 March after which further test results became available. 

Mr Cleary died on 20 March. 

Dr Farrell today recorded a narrative verdict, that Mr Cleary died as a result of a blockage of the main artery, due to inflammation of the heart tissue, because a tube put into his chest to administer a drug became infected with MSSA causing sepsis infection.

The hospital expressed sympathy to the Cleary family who were in the court for the verdict. 

They welcomed the recommendations made by the coroner which included that the hospital review its weekend laboratory policy. 

During the inquest the hospital said appropriate infection guidelines were in place at the time of Mr Cleary's death. 

The Beacon said infection control levels at the hospital were well above the acceptable standards nationally. 

There was no delay in implementing the correct treatment to Mr Cleary, it added.