McAnaspie accused blame each other over murder

Thursday 20 June 2013 10.34
Daniel McAnaspie was last seen alive in the Blanchardstown area in February 2010
Daniel McAnaspie was last seen alive in the Blanchardstown area in February 2010

Two Dublin men accused of the murder of a teenager in the care of the State at the time of his death three years ago have blamed each other for his death.

Richard Dekker, 27, and Trevor Noone, 25, both from Whitestown Avenue in Blanchardstown, have pleaded not guilty to the murder of Daniel McAnaspie at Tolka Valley Park, Blanchardstown on 26 February 2010.

The Central Criminal Court heard that both accused admitted they were present when the 17-year-old was murdered.

The court heard that the teenager asked for "another chance," but that one of the accused laughed before stabbing him several times with a garden shears.

Daniel was in the care of the Health Service Executive when he was last seen alive in Blanchardstown.

His badly decomposed body was found on farmland in Co Meath three months later with injuries to his heart, lung, stomach and throat consistent with having been stabbed with one blade of a garden shears.

Prosecuting Counsel Brendan Grehan said that both Mr Dekker and Mr Noone admitted they were present at the murder and said no one else was there.

Each said the other killed the 17-year-old.

In his opening statement, Mr Grehan said the prosecution case is based squarely on both of their interviews.

He said Mr Noone told gardaí that Mr Dekker was laughing when he stabbed Daniel, even though the teenager pleaded "sorry, give me another chance".

The court also heard that Mr Dekker said in his garda interviews that he was a bystander when Mr Noone killed Daniel, but that he only went to the park with them to enable Mr Dekker to give Daniel "a hiding".

He claimed he did not know Mr Noone was going to kill the boy.

Both men deny murdering the teenager, but the prosecution said that while the jury cannot consider what each man says about the other, both can be convicted on the basis of what both admit they did.