Council report says Dublin housing applicants deliberately stayed in poor accommodation

Tuesday 04 December 2012 11.11
A Dublin City Council report states that people 'aspired to actually worsening their circumstances'
A Dublin City Council report states that people 'aspired to actually worsening their circumstances'

People have been deliberately staying in poor accommodation to get priority on the Dublin City Council housing list, according to a council report.

The city's monthly meeting tonight agreed to replace the existing points system with allocations based on the length of time on the list.

DCC Assistant Manager Dick Brady stated in a report that under the old system people were reluctant to move into alternative temporary accommodation in case they lost points.

"In some instances, in order to attain higher points, applicants aspired to actually worsening their circumstances," he stated.

There will be three bands of priority. The top band will include medical and homeless cases, followed by those with overcrowding. All other cases will come under the third band.

However, allocation will be made on the length of time on the housing list.

Mr Brady claimed that this will encourage applicants to live in the best possible accommodation while they wait for their preferred social housing option.

The report also announced that the new Applicant Sourced Housing Scheme will allow people in need of social housing to find their own rented accommodation.

The council will pay the landlord and the tenant will pay the council a tenant rate.

The scheme will allow people to work and not lose benefit as they would under the Rent Supplement option.

Councillors back car pool scheme

Meanwhile, a plan to introduce a car pooling system in Dublin, similar to the bike scheme, has got the backing of city councillors.

New by-laws would allow cars to be left and collected from on-street parking zones in the city under a permit deal with car club companies.

The council has drawn up proposals for by-laws to regulate a system involving up to 1,000 vehicles where car club companies would pay 1.5 hours parking per day per vehicle giving their customers free use of on-street parking.

It is claimed one car pool vehicle can take 15 private cars off the streets.

The by-laws will now be put out for public consultation.

The Department of Transport is considering legislation to give designated parking spaces for the vehicles.

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