Rozanne Stevens

Many of you would know Rozanne from her foodie slot on the Pat Kenny Show on RTÉ Radio 1 for the last 4 years. Or follow Rozanne's nutrition based food and recipe column in the Health and Living Supplement of The Irish Independent Newspaper. Rozanne teaches a wide variety of cookery classes with a strong emphasis on healthy eating with a few wicked treats thrown in. Trained as a nutritional therapist, Rozanne is able to marry sound nutritional advice with gourmet recipes. Classes run from a luxurious venue in Citywest Business Campus, Dublin 24 and other venues around Ireland.

Monica's Berry Baileys Meringue Roulade

Monica's Berry Baileys Meringue Roulade

Rozanne says: "This is my mom's favourite dessert - a gorgeous confection of marshmallowy meringue, plenty of summer berries and whipped cream. I love adding a good splash of Baileys Irish cream liqueur for a little sophistication."

Monica's Magic Molten Chocolate Pudding

Monica's Magic Molten Chocolate Pudding

Rozanne says: "This is my mom's recipe and it is the easiest, most decadent chocolate pudding. It is like a giant chocolate fondant baked in a lasagne type dish. There are two parts to the recipe, a sponge batter and a sauce. These get made separately and then poured into the dish. They curdle and look strange, but during baking they separate and you get chocolate sponge on the top and a rich dark chocolate sauce underneath. Serve warm with cream or ice cream and fresh or frozen berries. Some of the solid ingredients are measured by volume in millilitres, so use your measuring spoons for small amounts and your measuring jug for larger quantities."

Norman's Butterflied Leg of Lamb with Lively Salsa

Norman's Butterflied Leg of Lamb with Lively Salsa

Rozanne says: "Anchovies can be bought in tins or glass bottles, preserved in salt and oil. They are an indispensable Pantry Pal in Italian cooking. They melt into dishes, imparting a rich, salty, savoury flavour. Don't be put off, as they aren't fishy and really work like a condiment. Be brave - try them! My dad is a pro at barbecuing, especially lamb. This may look like a large, daunting piece of meat, but it's actually very simple to cook and a hassle-free way to feed a crowd. The marinade and salsa are based on classic Italian flavour combinations and always work."

Creamy Mustard and Caper Cod

Creamy Mustard and Caper Cod

Rozanne says: "Capers are the fruit of flinders rose. I love the tiny nom pareille capers that are salty and delicate and go extremely well with fish, in salads and even on pizza! The larger caper berries on the stem look very attractive in a dish and aren't as salty. Capers come pickled in brine, so make a long lasting Pantry Pal, on hand to jazz up your recipes."

Boerewors Kofta and Cherry Tomato Chutney

Boerewors Kofta and Cherry Tomato Chutney

Coriander is a spice that permeates South African cooking, from our traditional boerewors sausage through to our cured meat speciality, biltong. The seeds have quite a different flavour from the fresh leaves. To get the most flavour, dry fry the whole seeds until you can smell them, then grind them down with a mortar and pestle or in a spice grinder.

Tremaine's West Coast Crayfish with Curried Citrus Butter

Tremaine's West Coast Crayfish with Curried Citrus Butter

English mustard powder is a seasoning and cooking condiment made from ground mustard seeds, turmeric and flour. It has a strong, sharp taste that is pungent rather than hot. You can also buy it ready prepared as a paste in a jar. I use English mustard to flavour salad dressings, marinades, basting sauces and any time a little oomph is required. It's a multi-purpose Pantry Pal.

Norman's Butterflied Leg of Lamb with Lively Salsa

Norman's Butterflied Leg of Lamb with Lively Salsa

My dad is a pro at barbecuing, especially lamb. This may look like a large, daunting piece of meat, but it's actually very simple to cook and a hassle-free way to feed a crowd. The marinade and salsa are based on classic Italian flavour combinations and always work.

Black Pudding Burgers

Black Pudding Burgers

This is my favourite burger recipe. Just the smell of them grilling drives my senses wild. The black pudding gives the perfect amount of fat to the burger and fantastic flavour, so there's no need for extra salt and pepper. There are five optional toppings, which you can serve all at once if you like!

Monica's Apple Caramel Sponge

Monica's Apple Caramel Sponge

My mom has been making this recipe for as long as I can remember. First, you bake the appley, cinnamony sponge, then you pour the steaming, rich caramel sauce over and allow it to sink in. Heaven with cream or custard. There are 140 varieties of apples that are native to Ireland with wonderful names like 'Cavan Rose' and 'Irish Molly'. Any eating or cooking apple will work, so have fun experimenting with different types, not the same old same old!

Superfood Slaw

Superfood Slaw

When I first moved to Ireland I was baffled and slightly horrified by the coleslaw/ham and coleslaw/cheese combo. In South Africa I'd only ever had coleslaw as a salad with a 'braai' (BBQ). Now I secretly enjoy this mayonnaisey concoction on a crusty roll! A real superfood, cabbage is such an integral part of Irish cuisine that I decided to give coleslaw the ish makeover. Use red cabbage, add another Irish superfood-seaweed- and lots super seeds and sprouted seeds and you have a super slaw. The dressing in this recipe is a lighter, zingier alternative to plain mayonnaise.

Spiced Citrus Cake

Spiced Citrus Cake

This is a wonderfully light, fluffy cake due to the airy whisked egg whites folded in. Subtly scented with spices and lightly fragranced with citrus, this cake is perfect with a cup of tea. Or serve as a dessert with Greek yoghurt and fresh fruit if you want a lighter finish to a meal. I've used vanilla bean paste here which is one of my Pantry Pals (I love the aroma and natural sweetness of real vanilla seeds). The solid ingredients in this cake are measured in millilitres, so use your measuring jug instead of weighing scales.

Seafood Chowder Pies

Seafood Chowder Pies

Ireland is very fortunate to have such an abundance of fresh seafood - so important as part of a varied and healthy diet. I love to experiment with new recipes, but I still come back to old favourites like fish chowder. I fell in love with seafood chowder on a wet October weekend in Doolin when I moved to Ireland many years ago. I use this basic mixture in several different ways - delish over a baked potato too!

Beef and Guinness Tagine

Beef and Guinness Tagine

Nothing is more Irish than a beef and Guinness casserole, but in the spirit of ish I had to change it up a bit. Guinness is quite bitter, so to balance that I took a cue from Moroccan cuisine and added dried prunes to the recipe. They break down and add to the rich, darkly delicious sauce. Every tagine needs a bit of spice, so I chose the allspice berry for another layer of warm flavour. You can add more root vegetables like parsnips and turnips for extra veggie power.

Churros French Toast Fingers

Churros French Toast Fingers

Churros, also known as the Mexican doughnut, are deep fried cylindrical shaped pastries. These are often served with cinnamon sugar and a chocolate dunking sauce. I don't like deep fried foods, so I have adapted good old fashioned French toast and given it a churros ish twist. I've added a bit of orange to complement the cinnamon and chocolate. An ooey gooey messy dessert, great fun for kids to make-chocolate everywhere!

Monica's Magic Molten Chocolate Pudding

Monica's Magic Molten Chocolate Pudding

This is my mom's recipe and it is the easiest, most decadent chocolate pudding. It is like a giant chocolate fondant baked in a lasagne type dish. There are two parts to the recipe, a sponge batter and a sauce. These get made separately and then poured into the dish. They curdle and look strange, but during baking they separate and you get chocolate sponge on the top and a rich dark chocolate sauce underneath. Serve warm with cream or ice cream and fresh or frozen berries. Some of the solid ingredients are measured by volume in millilitres, so use your measuring spoons for small amounts and your measuring jug for larger quantitites.