Bono is still shocked by the success of the band's iconic LP, The Joshua Tree, and admits he thinks the album is barking up the right tree thirty-years later.

The iconic LP, which is famously known to have come out of the group's love affair with America, garnered international attention for its socially and politically conscious words, including lyrics which sternly criticised the then US Republican president Ronald Reagan. 

Thirty years on from its release, Bono reckons the landmark album is still as current as ever, and says rehearsing songs for the anniversary tour was an "overpowering experience".

"I went in the other day and we sung The Joshua Tree for the very first time in thirty years," he told The Chris Evans Breakfast Show on BBC's Radio 2.

"I was really surprised at how it sounded and how relevant, really, it still was with what's going in on the world. There seemed to be a connection."
 

The group are preparing to set off on a tour across the US and Europe celebrating the hit record's anniversary, where they will perform the full album at each gig.

Bono added the band had initially only planned to do 3 or 4 dates but had now extended it to almost forty.

The Joshua Tree Tour will begin in Vancouver on May 12, ahead of a series of American stadium gigs before heading to Europe in July, and will be bringing the sold out tour to Croke Park on July 22. 

The tickets for the Irish leg of their tour sold out within a matter of minutes, prompting a call for renewed legislation to be introduced to deal with 'ticket touting' as tickets were being sold on re-sale sites for over 10 times their original value shortly after they went off sale on Ticketmaster.

The band's last hometown gigs were in late 2015 when they brought their iNNOCENCE + eXPERIENCE tour to the 3Arena for four sold out nights.