Orville Wright dismisses prospect of transatlantic flight
Orville Wright, pictured here with his late brother Wilbur, has voiced his scepticism about the the ability of modern aircraft to complete a transatlantic flight. This image appeared in Flight magazine in 1909. Photo: http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchive/

Orville Wright dismisses prospect of transatlantic flight

Published: 13 February 1914

Orville Wright, who, along with his late brother Wilbur, pioneered aviation in America, has said that the men planning to make transatlantic flights were ‘absolutely foolish’.

Mr. Wright believes that no engine has the capacity at present to stand the strain of flying at more than 100 miles per hour for 17 or 18 consecutive hours: ‘I should not dream of attempting it.’

Despite the reservations of Mr. Wright, Rodman Wannamaker, who is currently promoting the flight in tandem with the engine maker Glenn Curtiss, remains optimistic of success and says that Mr. Curtiss has ‘something up his sleeve’ in respect of the engine.

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