Re-establishing a viable breeding population of golden eagles in the north west.

Excitement as first pair of golden eagles breed in Ireland for over 90 years turns to disappointment as the egg is infertile.

Experts from Glenveagh National Park in north west Donegal have been monitoring a nest made by a pair of golden eagles which were introduced into County Donegal about 4 years ago.

It is understood one egg was laid in the nest but that it was infertile. However, experts are hopeful that the golden eagles may soon breed in the north west.

Reporter Timlin Ó Cearnaigh comments

By the year 1900 there were less than 14 pairs of golden eagles left in Ireland. The last Irish breeding pair was found in the north Mayo cliffs in 1912. The purpose of the Glenveagh project is to re-establish a viable breeding population of eagles in the north west. The project began in 2001 when young eaglets were brought from Scotland and relocated in Glenveagh National Park.

Lorcan O'Toole, Golden Eagle Project Manager, comments on how the eagles were brought from Scotland and released in Glenveagh. 

Glenveagh National Park was the site chosen for a project attempting to reintroduce golden eagles to Ireland. The project began in 2001 and by 2005 some 42 birds had been released into the wild.

This RTÉ news report was broadcast 11 May 2005.