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Cinema
Paddington (G) *****
It seemed like a nigh-on-impossible task to do justice to the institution that is Paddington on the big screen - but they've done it.
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This is the story of a lonely bear sent to forge a new life in England, far away from home. He lands on his paws when he is adopted by a London family who need him as much as he needs them.
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Paddington's magic has jumped intact from page to big screen - the messier the bear, the bigger the laughs. I cannot wait to watch it again with those I love reading the books to. Taragh Loughrey-Grant
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Horrible Bosses 2 (15A) **
If you're in the market for an undemanding, relatively amusing way to while away a couple of hours, then this could be just the ticket.
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The follow-up to 2011's hit comedy sees hapless trio Nick (Jason Bateman), Kurt (Jason Sudeikis) and Dale (Charlie Day) attempt to escape the shackles of the 9-5 slog by becoming their own bosses and making millions.
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What could go wrong? A whole lot, it turns out. The patchy script is saved by the chemistry between Bateman, Sudeikis and Day. Sarah McIntyre
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Possibilities are Endless (12A) ***
One Sunday evening in 2005, Scottish musician Edwyn Collins suffered a cerebral haemorrhage.
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Beginning with interviews conducted in 2011, this strikingly original documentary traces his perilous path to recovery.
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One can only marvel at what a distance Collins has travelled in those nine years. Before the stroke Collins was positive there was no afterlife. "Now I'm not, we'll see what happens," he tells us. Paddy Kehoe
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I Am Ali (PG) ***
The life of Muhammad Ali is already well represented in film - but with I Am Ali, director Clare Lewins has taken a new approach with an emphasis on Ali as family man and doting father.
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Her film takes a non-chronological path through Ali's life, as told by family, friends and associates.
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It's divided into chapters by interviews and interspersed with archival footage, but what brings I Am Ali to life in the poignant absence of the boxer himself is the use of private audio recordings he made with his children. Sarah McIntyre
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The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1
I was unsure how splitting the final Hunger Games novel into two films was going to work, but Mockingjay - Part 1 is thoroughly enjoyable. Jennifer Lawrence gives the best performance of the series to date and is so engaging to watch that the time flies.
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While there are elements from The Hunger Games and Catching Fire that were more action-packed and edge-of-your-seat exciting than the events of Mockingjay - Part 1, as a whole, I think it's possibly the best film, a perfect build up to Part 2 – the grand finale. 3.5/5 Sinead Brennan
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Get On Up (12A) ***
Tate Taylor's misfiring biopic of Godfather of Soul James Brown rejects real character examination and a natural narrative in favour of breathless reminders of just how very important James Brown was.
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In fact, compelling leading man Chadwick Boseman addresses the camera at several points to remind us of just how very important James Brown was.
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The movie, like a JB performance, jumps and slides confusingly - an exhausting and annoying approach. Alan Corr
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The Homesman (15A) ****
This is a delightfully quirky western, directed, co-written and starring Tommy Lee Jones, which features Hilary Swank in stand-out form as Mary Bee Cuddy, a middle-aged spinster from New York who lives in frontier Nebraska.
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When three local women show signs of insanity due to the hardship of their lives, she volunteers to bring them east to a church in Iowa that cares for the mentally ill.
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She frees land-grabber George Briggs (Jones) from a lynching in return for him aiding her, and their adventure begins. John Byrne
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Winter Sleep (Club) ****
Wordy and philosophical - like Ibsen or Chekhov a la Turk - the Palme d'Or-winning Winter Sleep is merciless in its portrayal of a flawed, vain-glorious individual who, in Biblical terms, does not see the mote in his own eye.
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In its close attention to the seed-bed of marital discord, the film resembles classic Ingmar Bergman dramas of the mid-1970s. Paddy Kehoe
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Standby (15A) **
It's Valentine's Day at Dublin Airport and Alice (Mad Men's Jessica Paré) is on standby for a flight home to New York.
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Then she meets Alan (Brian Gleeson) at the tourist desk at which he now works. They had a fling eight years previously in the US.
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Thus begins this Dublin rom-com which sadly needs a much smarter screenplay. Paddy Kehoe
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The Drop (15A) ***1/2
There is some beautiful chemistry between Tom Hardy and the late James Gandolfini in this thriller written by Mystic River and Shutter Island author Dennis Lehane.
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In terms of casting, look and feel, none of the decisions here could have been bettered. But just as the adaptation of Gone Girl felt like it was rushing to cram everything in, so too is the film of The Drop in too much of a hurry.
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That said, if you like crime movies, urban westerns and that Seventies vibe, you should see it. Harry Guerin
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