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Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation
There is no sign of things slowing down for the Mission: Impossible franchise, with Rogue Nation taking things up another notch. This time around, Ethan Hunt (Tom Cruise) is out to take down The Syndicate after the Impossible Missions Force is dissolved by the CIA.
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Cruise proves that he's still got it and if you thought the stunts couldn't get more impressive, think again. At 135 minutes, Rogue Nation has enough oomph to sustain your interest. Newbies to the franchise can dip into this and enjoy it for what it is – a masterclass in action-adventure.
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3.5/5 (12A) Sinead Brennan
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Hot Pursuit (12A) **1/2
Hot Pursuit is your typical odd-couple buddy comedy starring Reese Witherspoon as an intense, rule-following cop who has been assigned to protect sassy Colombian beauty Daniella Riva (Sofia Vergara).
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The potentially fantastic chemistry between the two actresses is sadly not realised for most of the film, and many of the jokes are so contrived you almost feel like there should be a laugh track. There are, admittedly, a couple of good lines in this film, and some fun parts. All in all, though, it's more of a lukewarm pursuit than a hot one. Kayla Walsh
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Beyond the Reach (12A) **1/2
Michael Douglas and Jeremy Irvine do their best but can't save this disappointing survival thriller.
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Douglas plays John Madec, a very rich and very obnoxious man whose life experience is that everybody has a price. The latest to be put to the test is Ben (Irvine), a young guide hired to bring Madec hunting before the season has officially begun.
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Beautifully shot, but too far-fetched to work. Harry Guerin
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Southpaw (15A) ***1/2
Jake Gyllenhaal's work here - both physical and mental - as Light Heavyweight Champion Billy Hope is excellent, and could well earn him his second Oscar nomination.
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Groan away at the character's surname but only the weariest of cinema curmudgeons will resist being sucked into Southpaw's riches-to-rags story.
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There is great support from Forest Whitaker as Gyllenhaal's trainer, but some of the plot developments towards the end let the film down. It could have been a contender. Harry Guerin
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You're Ugly Too (15A) ***
Quirky and low key are the bywords in this debut feature from Galway writer/director Mark Noonan. Aidan Gillen plays Will, a prisoner given compassionate early release to care for his orphaned niece, Stacey.
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The dialogue, some of which was ad-libbed, is smart and spiky. Real emotions are expressed in a amusing mix of sarcasm, flippancy and meaningful silences. It’s a muted, occasionally heart warming watch and a very Irish kind of sadness and dark humour hangs over it. Gillen and Kinsella are excellent and Noonan is a name to watch for. Alan Corr
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Inside Out (G) *****
For all the time and money we spend seeking an escape (and calorie consumption) in multiplexes, how often does it really feel like cinema history is unfolding right before our eyes? Well, that's what happens with Inside Out. Hyperbole? Not a bit of it.
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This glorious, life-affirming Disney-Pixar creation takes us on an adventure with 11-year-old Riley's emotions - Joy, Sadness, Disgust, Fear and Anger. It could well be the Best Picture Oscar winner next year - the first animated movie to win the top gong.
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A beautiful mind. Harry Guerin
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Eden (15A) **
The first of two summer film releases examining the dance music scene, French movie Eden is very much an elegiac nostalgia trip, harking back to a purer time before EDM cannibalised itself.
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Spanning over two decades, it begins in the early 90s and charts the rise of the so-called 'French Touch' movement - the distinctive brand of disco-infused house music - as told through the eyes of two pals.
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Punctuated by a blistering soundtrack of some of that era's biggest hits, the film eventually settles into a repetitive groove and doesn't go anywhere. One for fans. John O'Driscoll
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Legend of Barney Thomson (15A) ***
Robert Carlyle's directorial debut is pretty deft, and even more impressive given that he also appears in nearly every frame. He plays the eponymous Barney in a grimy black comedy about a Glaswegian barber who accidentally kills his boss.
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Carlyle is pitch-perfect as the accidental killer, while Emma Thompson dives into the role of Barney's mother. There are typically in-yer-face performances from Ray Winstone and Ashley Jensen as duelling cops, and Tom Courtenay laps it up as their acerbic boss. With a sharper script they'd have had a future classic. John Byrne
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True Story (15A) **1/2
You'd expect a film starring Jonah Hill and James Franco to feature lewd sex jokes, cameos from their mates, and copious amounts of marijuana. But this is far from the case in their latest joint venture.
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Hill plays a former New York Times journalist who receives a call informing him that a fugitive (Franco) has been captured in Mexico - where he was living under his name.
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Much of the tension rests on the audience being unsure whether the accused is guilty. This falls fairly flat, as the truth is obvious almost from the start. Kayla Walsh
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Ant-Man (12A) ****
Everyman favourite Paul Rudd gets the starring vehicle he deserves with Ant-Man, one of Marvel's best movies to date. He plays Scott Lang, a burglar with a Masters in electronic engineering who receives an offer he can't refuse from inventor Hank Pym (Michael Douglas).
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Like Guardians of the Galaxy, which similarly employed lesser-known (to the masses) characters from the Marvel universe to great effect, this is the surprise of the summer. More caper than cape and super-heist than superhero, it's fast and funny and thoroughly deserves a sequel. Marvel knows pest. Harry Guerin
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