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Cinema
Avengers: Age of Ultron (12A) **
More camp drollery and action from the Marvel stable as the gang take on another new threat. However, peak superhero has been reached in a big, loud and repetitive movie that sees the gang take on the super-brained Ultron, a renegade cyber bent on global destruction.
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It's all fine and functional. It's just not iconic, ironic or funny enough. I find the Marvel movie universe repetitive and dull, but Avengers: Age of Ultron will have geek boys and girls gurning all the way to IMAX. Alan Corr
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The Good Lie (12A) ***
The Good Lie is based on events that occurred in Sudan in the 1980s, when many young people were orphaned by the effects of Northern Militia air-strikes. Thanks to a humanitarian programme, 3,600 boys and girls would eventually go to the US.
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The subjects of this film - three young men and their sister - end up trying to adapt to life in the new land with help from Carrie (Reese Witherspoon.)
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Earnest but engaging. Paddy Kehoe
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Emperor's New Clothes (12A) ****
Director Michael Winterbottom and actor-turned-activist Russell Brand combine in this Michael Moore-lite documentary about the increasing – and monumental – gap between the rich and the rest.
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Basically a run through capitalism's greatest acts of greed since the financial collapse in 2008, it also blends in Brand stonewalling banker types.
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He may be annoying but the revolution has to start somewhere. John Byrne
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Glassland (15A) *****
Kerry director Gerard Barrett's just-as-special follow-up to his 2013 debut Pilgrim Hill is a masterful study of addiction, family and resilience.
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Jack Reynor is the son trying to save his alcoholic mother (Toni Collette) from herself - from the damp to the daily chaos and surprising moments of humour and tenderness, immersion in this world is absolute.
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The performances are superb, and you'll be doing well if another film moves you more this year. Harry Guerin
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Child 44 (16) **1/2
The Tom Rob Smith bestseller arrives starring Tom Hardy and Gary Oldman, but this Soviet era thriller should have been brought to the small screen rather than the big one - it needed six hours, not two.
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The film tries to shoe-horn massive story chunks into the running time, with the result that complexity and tension are lost as plot developments pile up like parts on a tractor assembly line because the conveyor belt is set at the wrong speed.
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Red missed, if you will. Harry Guerin
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A Little Chaos (12A) **
Alan Rickman takes the helm as director and the throne as King Louis XIV in this muddled romantic drama set just as the Sun King declares the creation of the Gardens of Versailles in the 1680s.
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Kate Winslet plays Sabine De Barra, a maverick landscape gardener who lands a plum role in the design of the King's new playground.
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Nice to look at but far too allegorical for its own good and strains under portentous dialogue that badly needs pruning. Alan Corr
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The Salvation (15A) ****
In the Wild West of the 1870s, Danish immigrant Jon (Mads Mikkelsen) arrives at a railway station to meet his wife and son who are coming to live with him. Tragedy strikes shortly afterwards, as mother and son are viciously murdered.
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Thus begins Jon's bid to chase down the killers. But a local misunderstanding and the presence of an evil blackmailer frustrate Jon's quest and endanger his life. Superb. Paddy Kehoe
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Cobain: Montage of Heck (16) ****
One of rock's great Christ-figures gets his own creation myth laid bare in this remarkable documentary by Brett Morgan. It's a compelling and disturbing watch.
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Morgan has excavated hours of audio, video and written archive to paint a portrait of a happy child who was left traumatised by family disarray before submerging himself into a drug limbo and cleansing himself with the power of punk rock.
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No rock star has inspired such devotion and pure belief since Cobain and just like Nirvana's music, Montage of Heck is both very powerful and very sad. Alan Corr
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John Wick (16) ****
When John Wick's wife dies she leaves him a puppy as a parting gift, but when the puppy is killed by a gang of Russian mobsters, all hell breaks loose. A retired criminal, Wick soon finds himself back in the dark underworld he fought hard to escape with one mission in mind - revenge.
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This may not be a movie that will win awards or change your views on world politics, but it is thoroughly entertaining. Plus, Keanu Reeves is doing what he does best, at his best. Bring on the sequel. Suzanne Keane
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Good Kill (15A) ***
Good Kill - starring Ethan Hawke in top form as tormented drone pilot Major Tom Egan - is an inspired movie that should be seen for its thought-provoking take on US military involvement abroad.
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It also stars Bruce Greenwood as the disillusioned Lt Colonel Johns, and January Jones is the wife enduring marriage to a man who is more absent than he was when he used to fly F-16s. Compelling stuff. Paddy Kehoe
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Where can I get RTÉ Aertel Digital?

RTÉ Aertel Digital is an enhanced digital version of the RTÉ Aertel teletext service. It functions in the same way as the analogue service, offering current news, sport and weather updates but is now more agile and easier to use.

RTÉ Aertel Digital is available on Saorview, the new free digital TV service in Ireland.
Press TEXT button on your remote to launch Aertel from RTÉ One, RTÉ Two, RTÉ News Now.