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Cinema
The Judge (15A) ****
High-flying lawyer Hank Palmer (Robert Downey Jr) returns home to Carleyville, Indiana to attend his mother's funeral. At the wake, old tensions re-ignite between Hank and his father, Joe (Robert Duvall).
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Dad is the district judge, who will need Hank's help more than he realises in this frequently moving courtroom drama/tearjerker. P Kehoe
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The Overnighters (Club) *****
Documentary The Overnighters is absorbing in its depiction of lives under stress in the godforsaken oil town of Williston, North Dakota. God has indeed forsaken the place, despite the best efforts of Pastor Jay Reinke.
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There is no love lost between the locals and the unemployed who are arriving in their droves, or, indeed, between Pastor Jay Reinke and the city council.
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But the good Pastor has his own difficulties. Paddy Kehoe
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Annabelle (16) ***
A prequel to last year's hit The Conjuring, the spooky doll Annabelle arrives as a present from cardboard-cute husband John Gordon to wife Mia, who's expecting their first child.
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The key, as always, is to build tension, but it's not always there, and things descend into cliché.
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Okay, it's not The Exorcist of The Wicker Man, but if you're not some horror bore and just want a bit of fun and the odd scare, Annabelle offers a good night's entertainment. John Byrne
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'71 (15A) ****
Jack O'Connell plays a British solider who's been separated from his unit in West Belfast in 1971 in this fast-moving and bloody thriller.
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'71 is visceral stuff, a vertiginous trip back to an era of military incompetence, sectarian savagery, and the lives of normal people scarred forever.
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O'Connell gives his all in what is a very physical role and the strong cast also includes Love/Hate's Charlie Murphy and Killian Scott. Alan Corr
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The Maze Runner (12A) ***1/2
While many say films are never as good as the books they're based on, sometimes it does work the other way around. A case in point is The Maze Runner.
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James Dashner's source bestseller is stodgy enough in places, but first-time director Wes Ball has turned it into a very watchable survival story where the characters are more interesting than their literary incarnations.
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Part Lost, part Lord of the Flies, The Maze Runner does a good job at depicting male bravado and insecurity and is grittier than expected. A fine debut from Ball. Harry Guerin
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Gold ***
Ray (David Wilmot) has real issues with his past, and like most people, he wishes that he could rewind the clock. When a tragic situation presents itself, allowing him to return to his hometown in north County Dublin after 12 long years away, Ray seizes the opportunity with open arms.
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Ray may be a bit all over the place and seem like he's good-for-nothing, but underneath his shoddy exterior he is a likeable and sweet man. Maisie Williams plays the lost teen daughter to perfection and adds a lot of warmth and heart to the film. The soundtrack is delightful. Laura Delaney
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Unbreakable: The Mark Pollock Story
Guaranteed to be the Irish film of 2014 for many who see it, the heart-rending but ultimately uplifting documentary Unbreakable charts a couple's journey as they try to move beyond the tragedy and trauma that became the reality of their lives.
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It tells the story of blind adventure athlete Mark Pollock, who became paralysed from the waist down after a fall from a window in 2010.
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Together with fiancée Simone George, Pollock seeks to find a breakthrough for those living with spinal injuries worldwide. A must-see. Harry Guerin
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Gone Girl (15A) ***
David Fincher's very long and very slick adaptation of Gillian Flynn's novel is a film of two havles. In the first hour, Ben Affleck is very good as a husband accused of his missing wife's murder and he's caught in a wicked chimera that provides some real entertainment for the audience.
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The second half, however, sinks into a morass of preposterous mystery caper clichés saved only by smooth direction and all-round solid performances. Fincher and Flynn have made a witty and stylish film based on a wildly successful novel but Gone Girl is not really a goer. Alan Corr
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Maps to the Stars (18) ****
Julianne Moore is Havana Segrand, the insecure Hollywood actress, despairing of her fading looks, and the loss of sexual allure.
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Meanwhile, Benji Weiss (Evan Bird) is a 13-year-old TV actor who has had serious troubles with drug abuse.
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Benji has visions of a girl who has recently died and is sane enough to be frightened of them in Cronenberg's masterful maelstrom, in which dark family secrets spin out into the open. Paddy Kehoe
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The Equalizer **
Denzel Washington's DIY retail vigilante Robert McCall is based on the role played by Edward Woodward in a TV series of the same name, about a long-coated gunslinger who administered extreme street justice.
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Here, Washington is a restless man living alone, who reads avidly and spends a substantial amount of night time in a local diner chatting to a wannabe pop star who's really a prostitute.
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She's under the spell of some Russian gangsters, so when she's hospitalised by a regular client he decides to mulch the mobsters. John Byrne
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RTÉ Aertel Digital is an enhanced digital version of the RTÉ Aertel teletext service. It functions in the same way as the analogue service, offering current news, sport and weather updates but is now more agile and easier to use.

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