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Cinema
We Are Your Friends (16) **
We Are Your Friends centres on a 23-year-old DJ named Cole Carter (Zac Efron) who is struggling to make a name for himself in the world of electronic music. Cole's life changes when he meets James (Wes Bentley), a charming older DJ who takes him under his wing. The film explores the emptiness of the millennial existence, particularly in LA. All in all, We Are Your Friends is a dull and mindless coming-of-age story full of boobs, biceps and bass that pretends to be deeper than it is. Kayla Walsh
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Straight Outta Compton (15A) ***1/2
This biopic of notorious west coast rappers NWA starts like an out-of-control train (on fire) but eventually skids into music movie convention. However, the lead performances by a bunch of unknowns are pretty astonishing.
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Ice Cube is played by his own son, O'Shea Jackson Jr; Corey Hawkins really does have Dr Dre's scowl, and even if they are sidelined as DJ Yella and MC Ren, Neil Brown Jr and Aldis Hodge do have real presence. However, it's Jason Mitchell who really does rush the show - his portrayal of Eazy E is uncanny.
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The dialogue is snappy and the atmosphere menacing but once the five members of the band change, from boys in the hood to rap princelings living in splendour in San Fernando Valley, Straight Outta Compton stops being an out-of-control train (on fire) and turns into an episodic music biopic. Alan Corr
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Hitman: Agent 47 (15A)
Based on the Hitman video games, this version starts with Zachary Quinto's character John Smith tracking a woman (Hannah Ware) who has only the vaguest notion of who she's searching for in Berlin - until a deadly assassin in a black suit (Rupert Friend) turns up and starts killing anyone in his way, as he seeks out the girl.
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Taken purely as a brainless action movie, it looks pretty good and isn't taxing. But being about as good as GI Joe: The Rise of Cobra hardly merits anything other than a snort of contempt. John Byrne
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45 Years (15A) ****
Charlotte Rampling and Tom Courtenay are Kate and Geoff, a couple who have weathered 45 years of marriage together. However, in the days leading up to their anniversary party, the arrival of a letter threatens their intimacy and trust.
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As a young man Geoff once walked through the Swiss Alps with a girl called Katya on the way to Italy. Then tragedy struck on the ice and Katya lost her life in seconds. Now her body has been discovered in the ice, many decades later. Masterful. Paddy Kehoe
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Miss Julie (Club) ***
John (Colin Farrell) is a valet who has long kept secret his lust or love (which is it?) for the young Julie (Jessica Chastain), daughter of the local worthy.
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However, he is already stepping out with the cook, Kathleen (Samantha Morton). Now protocol and decorum are about to be challenged, with deadly results. Over the course of one Midsummer Night, John's passion for Julie is unleashed as the petulant young lady effectively seduces him.
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Liv Ullmann directs in this taut three-hander that becomes wild melodrama. Paddy Kehoe
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Sinister 2 (16) **1/2
Sinister 2 is a sequel to the 2012 horror film, but this time around it was directed by Irishman Ciaran Foy. Foy got the job via Twitter – a story which is sadly more interesting than the film itself.
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While the atmosphere is creepy and there are plenty of jump scares, the film lacks subtlety and credibility. Kids – even bloodthirsty ones – aren't that frightening and the Bogeyman is on screen so often that he loses the power to terrify that he had in the first film. Kayla Walsh
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Vacation (15A) *
The reboot of Harold Ramis's 1983 classic National Lampoon's Vacation rehashes the main plot of the original but loses the heartfelt family sentiment along the way with its non-stop barrage of foul language and cringe-inducing gags.
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The characters have no depth and none of the clan is particularly likeable - worst of all fans of the first outing will feel let down by Chevy Chase and Beverly D'Angelo's cameos. The Griswold family really are better off staying at home next summer. Laura Delaney
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The Wolfpack (15A) ****
You won't forget the Angulo brothers after spending time in their lair in The Wolfpack, and such is the power of Crystal Moselle's documentary that the Oscars red carpet probably beckons for the director and her subjects.
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Probably? Well, Senna didn't get a nomination in 2012, and 2016 would also be all the poorer if this must-see isn't in the shake-up.
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It's a character study meets cautionary tale, one that explores parents' fears, children's dreams, the corrosive effects of isolation and, ironically, the escapism of cinema. A must-see. Harry Guerin
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The Great Wall (Club) *****
The Great Wall is brave, provocative cinema which deals with the tragic situation of the influx of immigrants into Europe – ever more topical with each day that passes.
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Topical the subject may be, but the film shirks topicality and news-worthiness to make its point with more force and subtlety. It avoids standard news footage, opting instead for subtle cinematography, including shots of migrants trying to climb into Europe at Melilla at night. Filmed in 11 countries, directed by Tadhg O'Sullivan. Paddy Kehoe
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Paper Towns (12A) *
Mariel Hemingway lookalike and current It girl Cara Delevingne stars as dream girl next door Margo in this hokey and dopey slice of teen fantasy from The Fault in Our Stars author John Green.
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She's the maverick beauty who ups and vanishes, leaving besotted boy next door Quentin (Nat Wolff) to try to find her.
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Paper Towns is insufferable stuff. Even the most dreamy-eyed young adult may conclude that this Margo is one gigantic pain in the ass. Alan Corr
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