Find a page

Cinema
The Babadook (15A)
While not as scary as the hype suggests, The Babadook is brilliantly acted, beautifully shot, has loads of tension and announces newcomer Jennifer Kent as a writer-director of real class and depth.
-
Her story of a mother and son (Essie Davis and Noah Wiseman) lost in the seemingly endless forest of grief will have you thinking plenty in the days, but more especially nights, after watching. This is not so much a case of feeling safer with the light on, but of being thankful that someone is snoring close to you. Harry Guerin
-
This Is Where I Leave You (15A) **
An all-star cast, including Jason Bateman, Tina Fey and Jane Fonda, can't save This Is Where I Leave You, a film that doesn't know whether it wants to be a drama or a comedy (better as the former).
-
A father's dying wish is that his family spend a week together after his funeral - cue reflections on choices made and opportunities missed.
-
It has a few moments, but you should seek solace in a marathon of Arrested Development, Rain Man, and Beautiful Girls instead. Harry Guerin
-
Alexander and the Very Bad Day ***
Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day is a classic Disney, real-people, fun-for-all-the-family, comedy and it's something that you could definitely sit down and watch, and even enjoy, without feeling as though your head is being melted.
-
Steve Carell is a brilliant haphazard dad and many of the best comedy moments are with him but each of the kids has some classic laughs of their own and you'll leave the cinema feeling kind of warm inside and the little ones are sure to have a ball.
-
Sinead Brennan
-
Love, Rosie ** 1/2
Rosie (Collins) and Alex (Clafin) are like two peas in a pod since they were kids and it’s clear that the pair have an attraction to each other. As the unspoken lovebirds prepare to enter the real world and graduate from high school, Alex is offered a medical scholarship at Harvard.. However, fate proves to have other plans for Rosie when an unexpected pregnancy forces her to stay at home in London (which is actually filmed in Dublin, red post boxes and all).
-
Both leads are extremely likeable and have magnetic onscreen chemistry. Clafin’s charm and handsomeness is reminiscent of a young Hugh Grant, but his role lacks depth. Collins is sweet as the single mum that just can’t seem to catch a break.
-
Laura Delaney
-
Fury (15A) ***1/2
Set during the final months of World War II, Fury follows the fortunes of a US Army sergeant (Brad Pitt) and his tank crew as the Allies make a final push into Nazi Germany. Into this gung-ho environment comes Norman Ellison (superbly played by Logan Lerman), a young and sensitive private. He's on a steep learning curve. It's not a classic by any stretch, but Fury is very entertaining and, at its heart, is as much about empathy, community and humanity as killing Nazis. That has to be a big positive. John Byrne
-
The Judge (15A) ****
High-flying lawyer Hank Palmer (Robert Downey Jr) returns home to Carleyville, Indiana to attend his mother's funeral. At the wake, old tensions re-ignite between Hank and his father, Joe (Robert Duvall).
-
Dad is the district judge, who will need Hank's help more than he realises in this frequently moving courtroom drama/tearjerker. P Kehoe
-
The Overnighters (Club) *****
Documentary The Overnighters is absorbing in its depiction of lives under stress in the godforsaken oil town of Williston, North Dakota. God has indeed forsaken the place, despite the best efforts of Pastor Jay Reinke.
-
There is no love lost between the locals and the unemployed who are arriving in their droves, or, indeed, between Pastor Jay Reinke and the city council.
-
But the good Pastor has his own difficulties. Paddy Kehoe
-
Annabelle (16) ***
A prequel to last year's hit The Conjuring, the spooky doll Annabelle arrives as a present from cardboard-cute husband John Gordon to wife Mia, who's expecting their first child.
-
The key, as always, is to build tension, but it's not always there, and things descend into cliché.
-
Okay, it's not The Exorcist of The Wicker Man, but if you're not some horror bore and just want a bit of fun and the odd scare, Annabelle offers a good night's entertainment. John Byrne
-
'71 (15A) ****
Jack O'Connell plays a British solider who's been separated from his unit in West Belfast in 1971 in this fast-moving and bloody thriller.
-
'71 is visceral stuff, a vertiginous trip back to an era of military incompetence, sectarian savagery, and the lives of normal people scarred forever.
-
O'Connell gives his all in what is a very physical role and the strong cast also includes Love/Hate's Charlie Murphy and Killian Scott. Alan Corr
-
The Maze Runner (12A) ***1/2
While many say films are never as good as the books they're based on, sometimes it does work the other way around. A case in point is The Maze Runner.
-
James Dashner's source bestseller is stodgy enough in places, but first-time director Wes Ball has turned it into a very watchable survival story where the characters are more interesting than their literary incarnations.
-
Part Lost, part Lord of the Flies, The Maze Runner does a good job at depicting male bravado and insecurity and is grittier than expected. A fine debut from Ball. Harry Guerin
-

Where can I get RTÉ Aertel Digital?

RTÉ Aertel Digital is an enhanced digital version of the RTÉ Aertel teletext service. It functions in the same way as the analogue service, offering current news, sport and weather updates but is now more agile and easier to use.

RTÉ Aertel Digital is available on Saorview, the new free digital TV service in Ireland.
Press TEXT button on your remote to launch Aertel from RTÉ One, RTÉ Two, RTÉ News Now.