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Cinema
Hercules (12A) ***
Brett Ratner lays it on thick and fast in this smart and snappy yarn from ancient Greece, but this Hercules is also big on myth-busting and humour.
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The Rock plays Hercules as a mercenary willing to do battle for either side as long as the payment is in cold hard gold. When the King of Thrace begs him to assist in training his army to take on an advancing enemy, Hercules' dormant nobility is stirred.
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At a neat 98 minutes, this Grecian epic won't give you a bad case of numb bum as you nod off between those spectacular battle scenes. Hercules is not as dumb as it looks. Alan Corr
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Earth to Echo (PG) ****
Mixing sci-fi, action, drama and even a small bit of innocent romance, Earth to Echo is reminiscent of the much-loved ET, but it's also modern and very much reflects young people and their use of social media in society today.
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Three pals try to boost their popularity by finding out just what is going on with their mobile phones. Before long they've found a new friend - one who needs help.
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A very enjoyable family movie that celebrates friendship and helping those in need. Aisling Brady
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Joe (16) ***
Fifteen-year-old Gary (Tye Sheridan) approaches rough diamond Joe (Nicolas Cage) who gives the young lad a start, poisoning trees on a plantation, intended for re-sowing.
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Gary's dad is a violent drunkard; his mother manages to just about keep the home together.
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Joe begins to look out for Gary, but he gets in way too deep, and comes up against some sinister local forces. Impressive, if a mite overblown in the climax. Paddy Kehoe
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Supermensch (Club) ****
Mike Myers makes his directorial debut with his warm-hearted and free-wheeling portrait of Shep Gordon, the Supermensch who accidentally ended up managing Alice Cooper and taking a ride on the crazy train of the Seventies and Eighties entertainment industry.
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Friends such as Michael Douglas, Sly Stallone and Cooper himself line-up to pay homage, and the anecdotes are as bug-eyed mad as they are funny. This is a charming homage to a charming man. As Myers once got on his knees to say to Alice Cooper in Wayne's World, we're not worthy. Alan Corr
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Dawn of Planet of Apes (12A) ***
In this smart blockbuster sequel we return to a shattered planet earth where humanity is mostly depleted and the apes are getting themselves back to the garden and doing rather nicely thank you very much.
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Both camps live in state of mutual suspicion and fear but when Homo Sapian and simian come into contact of the first time in many years, initial weary fraternity turns to tension to eventual bloodshed.
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As a complex drama and a solid action flick, Dawn of The Planet of The Apes really does come down from the trees. Alan Corr
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Boyhood (15A) ****
Boyhood is a rare yet fascinating film which was filmed in short spurts over 12 years. It's a story about growing up as seen through the eyes of a child called Mason (Ellar Coltrane), who we literally see grow up into an 18-year-old.
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At almost three hours, the film is quite lengthy but fortunately, the hours don't drag. You're thrown into nostalgia of the last decade as a young Mason ponders whether there'll ever be a new Star Wars.
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With its stellar soundtrack including Coldplay's Yellow, this is definitely worth the watch. Niamh Doherty
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Begin Again (15A) ****
Once writer-director John Carney brings us freewheeling charm, seat-of-pants energy and great songs once again in this story of a down-in-the-dumps singer-songwriter (Keira Knightley) and a burnt-out record executive (Mark Ruffalo) who rediscover their love of life by working together.
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Begin Again never gets too slick or too soppy, and in Knightley and Ruffalo the pairing is unlikely but just right.
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It will do your heart good - let's just call this the feelgood hit of the summer. Harry Guerin
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Transformers: Age of Extinction **
The early stages of this Transformers movie are actually quite entertaining as director Michael Bay introduces new characters, sets up the Transformers as fugitives and drops in some very impressive stunts.
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However, once it hits the 60-minute mark the constant barrage of explosions and metal-on-metal fighting begin to take their toll.
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Add heavy product placement, nausea-inducing camerawork and a script full of holes to the mix and it really becomes something of an endurance test. Suzanne Byrne
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Love Eternal (18) ***
In Love Eternal, James Harding - played as a young man by Robert de Hoog (Skin) - has been besieged by incidents of sudden, tragic death ever since he was a boy.
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The movie begins with father and son chasing each other through the woods, playing hide and seek. Then James discovers his father's inert body and his life begins to spiral out of control.
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Creepy, surreal and akin to Neil Jordan territory. Paddy Kehoe
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Tammy (15A) **1/2
Melissa McCarthy stars as Tammy, who loses her crummy burger joint job and then discovers her husband Greg (Nat Faxon) cheating on her with neighbour Missi (Toni Collette).
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Tammy decides to leave town and start a new life with her grandmother (Susan Sarandon), a hard-drinking, foul-mouthed individual.
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What follows is a largely endearing road movie that lacks a script worthy of the comedic and acting talent involved. But as a first effort from McCarthy (who co-wrote with husband and director, Ben Falcone), it's not bad – just not funny. John Byrne
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RTÉ Aertel Digital is an enhanced digital version of the RTÉ Aertel teletext service. It functions in the same way as the analogue service, offering current news, sport and weather updates but is now more agile and easier to use.

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