Find a page

Cinema
The Other Woman (12A) ***
Cameron Diaz stars as glamorous lawyer Carly, who has fallen head-over-heels for Mark (Nikolaj Coster-Waldau) - who just happens to be married to the perfect housewife, Kate (Leslie Mann).
-
When the ladies discover Mark has a third lady on the go, Amber (Kate Upton), they decide to get even.
-
A funny, well-written story that is based on friendship and revenge - perfect for a giggle with the girls. Suzanne Byrne
-
The Love Punch (12A) **
Pierce Brosnan and Emma Thompson play a posh English divorced couple plotting a jewel heist after their pension funds are obliterated as a result of a company buy-out.
-
They head to France to steal a diamond worth millions, along the way passing through some sub-standard dialogue and the flimsiest of plots.
-
While it’s nowhere near the grim experience of Batman and Robin or The Avengers – two films that show how easy it is for dreadful cinema to escape once there’s a decent cast – The Love Punch is a huge disappointment. And I love rom-coms. JB
-
The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (12A) ***
Masks off to Andrew Garfield: the most impressive thing about The Amazing Spider-Man 2 is just how much he has made the superhero (and guilt-ridden geek alter-ego Peter Parker) his own.
-
This sequel has better villains and set pieces but is too long and tries to shoehorn too many themes, subplots, primers and arcs into the story.
-
It's worth forking out for the 3D - just be prepared for that familiar and dreaded Marvel duo, Numb Rump and Stifled Yawn, to make an appearance. Harry Guerin
-
We Are The Best! (15A) ***
Set in Stockholm in 1982, this delightful coming-of-age movie sees introverted and socially-conscious Bobo and her garrulous friend Klara form a punk band.
-
It's a small affair that captures the major mortifications and minor triumphs of the teenage years brilliantly and there are beautifully naturalistic performances from the two hugely likeable leads as they tremble on the terrifying and tantalising brink of teen hood.
-
Will there be a sequel in five years time? Alan Corr
-
The Sea (12A) ***1/2
John Banville's Man Booker Prize-winning bestseller comes to the big screen with the sublime Ciarán Hinds playing the recently widowed Max.
-
Returning to the Wexford seaside where he spent his childhood summers, Max is haunted by both past and present.
-
If you liked the book, then the film should live up to the pictures in your head. And if you haven't read it, but enjoy a delicate character study, then you'll want to pick up a copy after watching. Harry Guerin
-
No Limbs No Limits (PG) ***
Joanne O'Riordan was born with no limbs, and is one of seven people currently living around the globe with Total-Amelia syndrome.
-
Her brother Steven’s inspiring, 68-minute film tracks her extraordinary life to date, centred on the invitation extended to the Cork girl to speak at the United Nations International Telecommunications Conference in New York, on her sixteenth birthday, in April 2012. Paddy Kehoe
-
The Last Days On Mars (16) **
The Last Days on Mars centres on a team of astronaut explorers who are reaching the final days on their mission on the red planet.
-
Despite, the impressive cast, the movie doesn’t try hard enough to put itself in a sci-fi horror league of its own.
-
The shaky camera and dusty scenes make for some cheap shots and fail to make the brutal aliens look more threatening. Robinson's poor attempt at creating a cliff-hanger of an ending will leave viewers feeling disappointed. Laura Delaney
-
Calvary (15A) *****
Brendan Gleeson has reunited with The Guard writer-director John Michael McDonagh, but it's a mistake to expect Calvary to be The Guard 2. Avoiding this film as a result would be an even bigger one.
-
The black comedy sees Gleeson play a widower-turned-good-yet-troubled priest in modern day Ireland. Taking confession from an unidentified local, his life is threatened.
-
Humour and the London-Irish writer go hand-in-hand, and just like his characters, the darker the better. Calvary is as uplifting as it is depressing. Taragh Loughrey-Grant
-
The Raid 2 (18) ***1/2
After the genre redefining genius of 2012's The Raid, cop-turned-one-man-army Rama (Iko Uwais) returns in an uneven sequel.
-
While The Raid worked so well because of the hell-in-a-tower-block tightness of its plot, The Raid 2's expanded universe and Godfather-meets-grindhouse aspirations are problematic.
-
Of course, it's still far better than 95% of Hollywood's tough-nut offerings - just don't be surprised if you look at your watch on more than one occasion. Harry Guerin
-
Half of a Yellow Sun (Club) **1/2
The big screen take on Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's Orange Prize-winning novel of the same name, Half of a Yellow Sun is another of those noble literary adaptations that has arrived without much of a fanfare.
-
It has a strong cast, mixes drama with real-life events (the Nigerian Civil War) and reminds you how much there is to discover of this world.
-
However, good acting and excellent period detail are somewhat hampered by a trying first 45 minutes and a rushed ending. Half of a great film, if you will. Harry Guerin
-

Where can I get RTÉ Aertel Digital?

RTÉ Aertel Digital is an enhanced digital version of the RTÉ Aertel teletext service. It functions in the same way as the analogue service, offering current news, sport and weather updates but is now more agile and easier to use.

RTÉ Aertel Digital is available on Saorview, the new free digital TV service in Ireland.
Press TEXT button on your remote to launch Aertel from RTÉ One, RTÉ Two, RTÉ News Now.